Nebraska high school football statistics leaders, Sept. 12 | Football – Omaha World-Herald

Nebraska high school football statistics leaders, Sept. 12 | Football - Omaha World-Herald nevin manimala

Nebraska high school football statistics leaders, as published in The World-Herald.

RUSHING Att. Yds. Avg. TD

Halleen, Lincoln SE 52 342 171.0 4

Harris, Millard South 27 277 138.5 5

Braasch, Columbus 26 268 134.0 2

Valencia, Millard West 36 262 131.0 0

Maessner, Kearney 38 257 128.5 3

Hustad, Elkhorn South 29 236 118.0 6

Wright, North Platte 39 225 112.5 0

Ducker, Bellevue West 17 222 111.0 6

Price, Papillion-LV 39 204 104.5 0

Macumber, Elkhorn 28 198 99.0 x

PASSING C-A-I Yds. Avg. TD

Glantz, Bellevue West 30-44-0 608 304.0 7

Burke, Omaha Burke 26-43-0 358 179.0 3

Cooper, Fremont 24-38-0 350 175.0 5

Cahoy, Grand Island 25-38-0 340 170.0 4

Crandall, Papio South 17-24-1 314 157.0 2

Payton, Westside 14-20-0 314 157.0 4

Coniglio, Cre. Prep 27-36-0 310 155.0 3

Barrientos, Om. South 15-32-3 302 151.0 7

Murray, Kearney 12-31-3 277 138.5 4

Urban, Millard South 20-35-0 273 136.5 3

RECEIVING No. Yds. Avg. TD

Watts, Omaha Burke 17 221 110.5 2

Dengel, Bellevue East 9 220 110.0 0

Stroh, Kearney 7 213 106.5 4

Griggs, Omaha South 7 203 101.5 5

Taylor, Millard South 6 187 93.5 3

Betts, Bellevue West 7 186 93.0 3

I. Appleget, Lincoln SE 8 176 88.0 1

Douglass, Grand Island 8 174 87.0 4

Helms, Bellevue West 6 160 80.0 1

Weidemann, Om. Westside 2 77 77.0 0

SCORING TD FG EP Pts. Avg.

Griggs, Omaha South 6 0 0 36 18.0

Ducker, Bellevue West 6 0 0 36 18.0

Hustad, Elkhorn South 6 0 0 36 18.0

Gomes, Millard West 5 0 0 30 15.0

Larson, Lincoln East 5 0 0 30 15.0

Douglass, Grand Island 5 0 0 30 15.0

PUNTING No. Yds. Avg.

Larson, Lincoln East 4 45.0 60

Franke, Gretna 6 40.0 47

Mikkelsen, Bellevue East 2 40.0 40

Foster, Bellevue East 6 39.7 43

Mangelsen, Norfolk 10 39.4 71

Hohl, Lincoln SW 6 38.5 40

Diaz, Omaha Central 5 37.8 46

Lampkin, Omaha Burke 11 37.5 68

Scholl, Gretna 6 37.2 40

Johnson, Lincoln East 4 36.3 40

TACKLES UT AT TT Avg.

Unassisted tackles 2 points, assists 1 point

Larchick, Gretna 14 8 36 18.0

Loergan, Lincoln Pius X 15 4 34 17.0

Kelly, Millard North 11 11 33 16.5

Rogers, Papio South 9 14 32 16.0

McCurdy, Fremont 13 5 31 15.5

Splater, Norfolk 9 13 31 15.5

Terrell, Omaha Bryan 13 4 30 15.0

Interceptions: 3, Stone, Fremont. 2, Hinken, Mckinnis, GI; Lojing, Fremont; Griggs, Forget, McGary, Om. South; Closman, MN

TEAM OFFENSE Rush Pass Avg.

Bellevue West 411 610 510.5

Millard South 609 307 459.0

Columbus 583 263 423.0

Omaha South 519 302 410.5

Grand Island 425 368 396.5

Elkhorn South 606 149 377.5

Kearney 473 277 375.0

Omaha Westside 421 314 367.5

Lincoln Southeast 475 255 365.0

Omaha North 491 227 359.0

RUSHING Att. Yds. Avg. TD

Krul, Scottsbluff 35 371 185.5 4

Harsh, Scottsbluff 24 321 160.5 6

Gordon, Omaha Skutt 24 235 117.5 3

Diesing, Omaha Skutt 34 232 116.0 3

Nieman, Waverly 33 224 112.0 3

Madden, Ralston 14 223 111.5 4

Ramos, Lexington 24 200 100.0 2

Paces, Ralston 30 199 99.5 1

Canoyer, Waverly 33 183 91.5 5

PASSING C-A-I Yds. Avg. TD

Bohn, Bennington 83-133-4 784 392.0 3

Synek, Hastings 34-54-1 532 266.0 3

Dotzler, Om. Roncalli 30-48-1 471 235.6 5

Oerter, Norris 22-37-0 423 211.5 3

DeMayo, Elkhorn MM 24-39-1 400 200.0 3

Stewart, Blair 36-61-3 387 193.5 1

Carpenter, Lexington 15-32-2 324 162.0 0

Gordon, Omaha Skutt 18-31-x 323 161.5 4

Dubray, Alliance 22-48-x 280 140.0 2

Myers, Seward 20-38-3 275 137.5 4

RECEIVING No. Yds. Avg. TD

Roepke, Elkhorn MM 13 311 155.5 3

Corrigan, Bennington 18 201 100.5 5

Richman, Lexington 7 181 90.5 1

S. Orr, Omaha Roncalli 8 160 80.0 3

Nauert, Hastings 5 157 78.5 1

Juengst, Grand Island NW 6 152 76.0 3

Shoemaker, Hastings 10 152 76.0 1

Schmaderer, Bennington 8 149 74.5 2

Puck, Bennington 13 140 70.0 0

Fenoglio, Omaha Roncalli 9 140 70.0 1

SCORING TD FG EP Pts. Avg.

Canoyer, Waverly 5 0 7 37 18.5

Harsh, Scottsbluff 6 0 0 36 18.0

Gordon, Omaha Skutt 3 0 13 31 15.5

Corrigan, Bennington 5 0 0 30 15.0

PUNTING No. Yds. Avg.

Sanders, Grand Island NW 3 46.3 55

Brinker, Omaha Skutt 4 39.8 —

Eggert, Plattsmouth 8 38.8 48

Molgaard, Ralston 3 37.7 40

Williams, Norris 6 35.5 —

Kalvelage, Hastings 8 35.1 43

TACKLES UT AT TT Avg.

Kavulak, Seward 12 17 41 20.5

Meneses, Plattsmouth 14 10 38 19.0

Folchert, Alliance 13 8 34 17.0

Heaton, Grand Island NW 8 16 32 16.0

Meyer, Norris 6 19 31 15.5

Erwin, York 8 14 30 15.0

Interceptions: 2, Pohlmeier, Plattsmouth; Richman, Lex; Schawang, Wav.; Schmoker, McCook

TEAM OFFENSE Rush Pass Avg.

Scottsbluff 813 187 500.0

Omaha Skutt 628 323 475.5

Bennington 78 793 435.5

Omaha Roncalli 260 498 379.0

Hastings 203 532 367.5

Norris 295 423 359.0

Waverly 630 63 346.5

Ralston 522 169 345.5

Lexington 260 395 327.5

OTHER OMAHA-AREA SCHOOLS

RUSHING Att. Yds. Avg. TD

Egr, Yutan 51 397 198.5 5

Christensen, Platteview 52 352 176.0 3

Torosian, Concordia 25 258 129.0 3

Knott, Louisville 36 220 110.0 3

Luben, Wahoo 25 205 102.5 5

Lilly, Wahoo Neumann 35 203 101.5 6

Grafelman, Brownell Talbot 21 201 100.5 3

PASSING C-A-I Yds. Avg. TD

Torosian, Concordia 24-42-2 447 223.5 2

Halford, Fort Calhoun 23-46-2 394 197.0 4

C. Pugsley, Br. Talbot 18-27-0 341 170.5 3

Washburn, Ashland 23-48-1 253 126.5 3

Miller, Arlington 17-25-0 240 120.0 3

Waido, Wahoo 17-25-0 227 113.5 4

RECEIVING No. Yds. Avg. TD

Pittman, Arlington 10 183 81.5 0

T. Pugsley, Br. Talbot 7 148 74.0 1

Haag, Mead 4 123 61.5 1

Strauss, Fort Calhoun 8 119 59.5 2

Walling, Wahoo 6 118 59.0 3

Jacobsen, Ashland-GW 5 111 55.5 2

Domsch, Concordia 3 110 55.0 2

SCORING TD FG EP Pts. Avg.

C. Pugsley, Br Talbot 7 0 8 50 25.0

Lilly, Wahoo Neumann 8 0 0 48 24.0

Bergstrom, Om. Christian 5 0 8 38 19.0

Egr, Yutan 5 0 2 32 16.0

Luben, Wahoo 5 0 0 30 15.0

TACKLES UT AT TT Avg.

Therkildsen, Fort Calhoun 17 8 42 21.0

Bordovsky, Wahoo 14 10 38 19.0

Millikan, Platteview 13 10 36 18.0

Grafelman, Brownell Talbot 7 19 33 16.5

Snipes, Conestoga 11 11 33 16.5

Kolterman, Wahoo 10 12 32 16.0

Dierks, Fort Calhoun 12 6 30 15.0

Interceptions: 3, Haag, Mead. 2, T. Pugsley, OBT; Jacobsen, Ash-GW

TEAM OFFENSE Rush Pass Avg.

Omaha Brownell-Talbot 566 391 478.5

Omaha Concordia 438 447 442.5

Yutan 671 115 393.0

Ashland-Greenwood 457 268 362.5

Wahoo 443 227 335.0

No report — Class A: Omaha Benson. Class B: Gering, Omaha Gross, South Sioux City. Omaha-area: Elmwood-Murdock, Weeping Water.

African American bachelor’s degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering

African Americans are seeing growth in many engineering and physical sciences fields, but they are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population.

A report from the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center (SRC) examined the number of bachelor’s degrees earned from 2005 to 2015 and separated out the numbers for African Americans from the rest of the students. The data was gathered by the National Center for Education Statistics from postsecondary institutions in the United States.

The SRC found the number of degrees earned by African Americans in physical sciences fields grew by 36% over 10-year period, which was less than the growth of degrees by all students, 55%, during the same time.

In four of the seven physical sciences fields, the number of degrees earned by African Americans grew faster (by percentage) than the growth overall, but those fields were among the smallest number of degrees earned. The other fields, which had larger numbers of graduates, showed a slower than overall growth rate.

In engineering, the number of bachelor’s degrees earned by African Americans increased by 19%, less than half of the overall growth in the field of 44%.

Only two fields in engineering (civil engineering and materials engineering) showed growth in the number of African American graduates when compared to the rest of the students in those fields. The other seven disciplines showed slow or negative growth.

SRC senior survey scientist Laura Merner said it was heartening to see growth for African Americans overall in the science and engineering fields, but it is not fast enough.

“We’re hopeful that this report could help intervention programs to be more successful to improve representation,” Merner said. “Clearly, more research is needed to find out why African Americans are underrepresented in these fields, and there is still work that needs to be done.”

The number of African Americans earning bachelor’s degrees in the physical sciences and engineering has grown during the 10-year period from just under 6,000 degrees earned in 2005 to more than 7,000 degrees earned in 2015. While more African Americans earned degrees in 2015 than in 2005 in the physical sciences, for engineering, the number for men earning degrees showed an increase while the number of women earning degrees decreased.

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

County suicide statistics mirror national trends | News – Indiana Gazette

County suicide statistics mirror national trends | News - Indiana Gazette nevin manimala
County suicide statistics mirror national trends | News - Indiana Gazette nevin manimala

The United States is the only industrialized country where suicides have been continually on the rise, and many believe the numbers are still underestimated due to how deaths by suicide are classified. To be ruled suicide, the intent to die must have been communicated. This makes deaths such as those by overdose difficult to properly account for because it is difficult to tell if the overdose was accidental or intentional.

Currently, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the country. The rate of death by suicide is two and a half times higher than that of homicides and has seen a steady increase since 1999. The group that has seen the highest increase is white, middle-aged males, a statistic that is also reflected locally.

So far this year there have been six suicides in Indiana County. Last year 18 were recorded. Of the six, five have been males, and the victims have ranged in age from 14 to 83.

“Just like nationally, though, we believe the number may be higher due to circumstances such as overdoses,” said Dr. Ralph May, a psychologist at the Community Guidance Center.

May and Dr. Joseph Buzogany of Indiana Regional Medical Center presented “Mental Notes: Suicide Prevention” Wednesday night at the Rustic Lodge in White Township.

Indiana County fits the bill for other national statistics as well. Studies have shown that suicide rates in rural areas are higher than in urban areas. Reasons include increased chances of isolation and easier access to firearms, which is one of the most common methods of suicide.

More overarching factors are seen in most people who express suicidal ideation. Factors such as drug or alcohol addiction and untreated mental health issues have a heavy affect on those who are contemplating suicide, May said.

There are several methods and risk assessments that doctors use when a patient expresses thoughts of suicide. These assessments allow doctors to analyze patients’ responses to questions and judge what sort of treatment and steps to take to help them.

Buzogany, a psychiatrist with IRMC, spoke on treatments for patients.

“It’s important to ask people if they’re suicidal. I always ask my patients if they feel suicidal or homicidal on every visit, even if they walk in looking happy. Some always tell me ‘no’ every time and ask me why I ask them the same question at every appointment and I always tell them ‘because some people say yes.’ So it doesn’t matter what they look like outwardly, I always ask.”

May also stressed the importance of routinely talking about suicide.

“If you notice someone acting down or talking in a way that seems off, ask them outright if they’ve thought about suicide. Sometimes people just need the prompt to talk about it. And when they do talk, listen,” May said.

Many times people who are having these thoughts will keep them to themselves out of embarrassment or fear of being “locked away,” May said.

May and Buzogany agree that these questions should be standard protocol for any doctor’s visit, even if the person seems healthy.

“It’s important to make it something people talk about and aren’t afraid to get help for,” said May.

Talk turned to other methods of prevention as well as noticing signs in those around you. While suicide is complex and not all people show signs of ideation, a majority of the cases do, May said. The most common examples are feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness, that life is no longer worth living.

“One very telling sign is acting as though they are perceived as a burden,” said May. “If they’re saying things like ‘things would be better off if I wasn’t here’ or ‘it would be better if I were just gone,’ it’s a good chance they’re at least thinking about it. Talk like this very common in those who are suicidal. Ask and pay attention when people are talking like this.”

Buzogany also talked about a certain mindset that those who are suicidal tend to get stuck in.

“No one would rather be dead if there was an alternative. When someone is truly suicidal, the chemicals in their brain have convinced them that there is absolutely no alternative and even the good things that happen to them do not matter. It’s important to recognize when someone is in this state and buy as much time as we can to get them help to work on it,” Buzogany said.

The presentation included resources that are available in Indiana County. The Suicide Task Force offers services as well as classes and workshops to help people recognize a crisis situation. One such training is QPR, a topic that was touched on in the presentation. QPR stands for Question, Persuade and Refer, three steps that can help save someone from committing suicide. These steps can help a person identify a crisis, question the person, persuade them to seek help, offer hope and then help refer them to the proper resources. Training is available for QPR through the task force and more information and scheduling are available by calling Brandy King at (724) 463-8200.

A 24/7 crisis hotline can be reached at 1-877-333-2470.

However, both May and Buzogany stressed that in an emergency situation where someone is actively attempting harm, it is imperative for you to leave the situation and call 911 immediately.

“Do not engage with someone in this type of emergency situation,” Buzogany said. “Anyone who is in the mental state to harm themselves with a loaded weapon may turn it on others. It’s important to keep yourself safe as well as get the proper authorities involved.”

For more information on the services provided by the task force, including information on upcoming events and seminars, visit www.stf32.com.

statistics; +399 new citations

statistics; +399 new citations Report, nevin manimala
statistics; +399 new citations Report, nevin manimala

Johannessen A, Lønnebotn M, Calciano L, Benediktsdóttir B, Bertelsen RJ, Bråbäck L, Dharmage S, Franklin KA, Gislason T, Holm M, Janson C, Jarvis D, Jõgi R, Kim JL, Kirkeleit J, Lodge C, Malinovschi A, Martinez-Moratalla J, Nilsen RM, Pereira-Vega A, Real FG, Schlünssen V, Accordini S, Svanes C.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 Sep 7. pii: S0091-6749(19)31172-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.08.030. [Epub ahead of print]

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statistics; +573 new citations

statistics; +573 new citations Report, nevin manimala
statistics; +573 new citations Report, nevin manimala

van de Putte R, van Rooij IALM, Marcelis CLM, Guo M, Brunner HG, Addor MC, Cavero-Carbonell C, Dias CM, Draper ES, Etxebarriarteun L, Gatt M, Haeusler M, Khoshnood B, Klungsoyr K, Kurinczuk JJ, Lanzoni M, Latos-Bielenska A, Luyt K, O’Mahony MT, Miller N, Mullaney C, Nelen V, Neville AJ, Perthus I, Pierini A, Randrianaivo H, Rankin J, Rissmann A, Rouget F, Schaub B, Tucker D, Wellesley D, Wiesel A, Zymak-Zakutnia N, Loane M, Barisic I, de Walle HEK, Roeleveld N, Bergman JEH.

Pediatr Res. 2019 Sep 9. doi: 10.1038/s41390-019-0561-y. [Epub ahead of print]

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Catherine Rampell: The Trump administration’s war on statistics is now threatening lives – Salt Lake Tribune

Catherine Rampell: The Trump administration's war on statistics is now threatening lives - Salt Lake Tribune nevin manimala

First, they came for the unemployment rate, and we brushed it off as tinfoil-hat nonsense.

Then they came for crowd sizes, and we laughed at the absurdity.

The next victim was the deficit, which they said was shrinking even as we saw it rising; also climate data, which they denigrated, doctored or disappeared without a trace. But we said, eh, they always do that, no big deal.

They purged the data-crunchers who tabulate crop prices and other agricultural statistics, and we ignored it because we weren’t farmers. They even came for the yield curve, which they said hadn’t inverted when it had, but also that even if it did invert, the inversion would mean the opposite of what everyone knows it means.

Now, they’ve come for the weather forecast. And if earlier episodes in President Trump’s war on statistics threatened livelihoods, this one threatens lives.

For a week, Trump obsessively insisted that his errant tweet about Hurricane Dorian’s threat to Alabama was correct. The episode included a moment so ridiculous it would have been too broad even for the HBO comedy series “Veep”: Last Wednesday, Trump showed a hurricane map that had obviously been doctored with a Sharpie.

It was funny, telegenic, easy to grasp. So, understandably, Sharpiegate got news coverage up the wazoo. The more ominous developments in this saga, however, got significantly less attention. They happened the previous Sunday, when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) sent a secret agencywide directive warning its scientists not to contradict the president, and then the subsequent Friday, when NOAA released an unsigned statement backing Trump’s false forecast and disparaging its own scientists. It was reportedly sent after the commerce secretary threatened firings.

Sure, Trump’s attacks on objective statistics, scientists or really any independent source of accountability are nothing new. On the contrary, such attacks have become ubiquitous. Anyone who dares to produce or even accurately report on politically inconvenient metrics is allegedly participating in a vast anti-Trump conspiracy or is somehow rooting for America to fail.

And, at this point, media corrections of Trump’s false claims about stock performance, or air purity, or the strength of the manufacturing sector, can feel tedious, pedantic and exhausting. Trump’s just being Trump, pundits scold. We should all move on to “real” concerns rather than these distractions from whatever other horrible (or, depending on your viewpoint, wonderful) things the administration is doing.

But these are real concerns. Trump’s attempted manipulations of official metrics — and the aspersions he casts upon metrics he cannot manipulate — degrade our democracy, economy and public safety.

Distrust in official data is deadly to voters’ ability to evaluate public policies, as well as the records of the officials crafting or overseeing those policies.

This numerical nihilism likewise wears on companies’ and households’ abilities to make informed and economically efficient decisions, something Trump’s billionaire Cabinet should appreciate.

And as illustrated by the administration’s insistence that even the weather report is fake, the erosion of trust in government data can also kill people.

The director of the National Weather Service gave a brave speech on Monday — at an annual meteorological meeting in Alabama, of all places. He noted that shortly after Trump’s initial Alabama hurricane tweet, the National Weather Service’s Birmingham office noticed its “phones and social media” light up with questions about Dorian. Without actually knowing what had triggered these worried inquiries, it tweeted to assure the public that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from #Dorian.”

“They did that with one thing in mind: public safety,” NWS Director Louis Uccellini said, defending the employees his superiors had attacked. “The Birmingham office did this to stop panic.”

After all, just as there are costs to failing to alert people about dangerous weather, so, too, are there costs to encouraging people to freak out about dangerous weather that doesn’t exist. For the National Weather Service, long-term credibility matters: If people come to believe the government hypes or even invents the risk of natural disaster, they might ignore those warnings next time there actually is significant risk of natural disaster.

This problem is not theoretical. It happened in Joplin, Missouri, in 2011, when 158 people died from a powerful tornado despite National Weather Service warnings. A subsequent NOAA report found that the perceived frequency of tornado warning sirens had caused people to become “desensitized or complacent” and “not take protective action” until it was too late.

Just as we don’t want Americans to become “desensitized or complacent” about the risk of deadly weather, neither should we allow ourselves to become “desensitized or complacent” about the risk this president presents to one of our country’s most precious assets: reliable, trustworthy, nonpartisan public data.

Catherine Rampell

Immigration: Mixed Signals On Bahamians, Southern Border Statistics – NPR

Immigration: Mixed Signals On Bahamians, Southern Border Statistics - NPR nevin manimala
Immigration: Mixed Signals On Bahamians, Southern Border Statistics - NPR nevin manimala

Will the U.S. welcome Bahamians fleeing their country after Hurricane Dorian? And, the number of migrants apprehended at the southern border dropped in August for the third month in a row.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Thousands of people from the Bahamas are trying to flee the devastation left by Hurricane Dorian. The question is whether the United States is going to welcome them. At first, the Trump administration said that they would accept anyone from the Bahamas, for humanitarian reasons. Then late yesterday the Department of Homeland Security added a hurdle, saying that those coming by boat would still need a visa. NPR’s Joel Rose is covering this and joins us in studio. Hi, Joel.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Hey, Rachel.

MARTIN: So this is confusing for us on this end, even more confusing for people in the Bahamas, and the stakes so much higher for them, clearly.

ROSE: Right. I mean, there are real mixed signals here. Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan held a White House press briefing yesterday, and he told reporters this.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARK MORGAN: If your life is in jeopardy, and you’re in the Bahamas, and you want to get to United States, you’re going to be allowed to come to United States – right? – whether you have travel documents or not.

MARTIN: OK.

ROSE: But later President Trump told reporters that, quote, “everybody needs totally proper documentation,” unquote, because immigration authorities need to be careful about who’s coming into the country. And late last night the Department of Homeland Security put out new guidance – anyone arriving by air or sea has to have a valid passport. If you’re flying into the U.S. from Freeport or Nassau, which is the Bahamas capital, you don’t need a visa. But if you’re arriving by boat, you are going to need a passport and a visa to get into the U.S.

MARTIN: Why? I mean, what’s the administration’s rationale here?

ROSE: Well, partly, this is following a longstanding policy for Bahamians, which says they can get into the U.S. without a visa as long as they go to the airport with a passport and documentation that they do not have a criminal record. But according to this latest guidance, that’s not going to apply to residents who are coming by boat. Here’s President Trump yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: I don’t want to allow people that weren’t supposed to be in the Bahamas to come in to the United States, including some very bad people and some very bad gang members and some very, very bad drug dealers.

ROSE: U.S. officials say the embassy in Nassau is open for emergency visa appointments. But this is an extra step. It could mean possible delays for people who are in a desperate situation after the hurricane. And Florida’s two Republican senators have asked the Trump administration to waive any visa requirements for residents of the Bahamas.

MARTIN: So just so I’m clear – the president is saying it’s not necessarily about Bahamian; this is about people who were in the Bahamas, not on the up and up.

ROSE: That’s what he said.

MARTIN: OK. So the thrust of the briefing yesterday was supposed to be about the southern border, the U.S.-Mexico border. The administration called it to announce that the number of migrants taken into U.S. custody at the border has declined for the third month in a row. Is that true, Joel?

ROSE: It is. The crossing numbers continue to go down. Just over 64,000 people were either apprehended by the Border Patrol or taken into custody at the ports of entry. That is a big reduction since May, when the total number peaked at more than 144,000. And the administration credits a lot of this drop to the efforts of Mexico. Under a deal that was signed in June, the Mexican government has sent National Guard troops to its borders, and Mexico has also agreed to allow tens of thousands of Central American asylum-seekers to stay in that country while they wait for their day in U.S. immigration court.

But U.S. officials say we are still facing an emergency at the border. I talked yesterday to the acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Matthew Albence. Here’s what he said.

MATTHEW ALBENCE: There are still tens of thousands of people that are trying to enter our country illegally. That is a crisis. Our infrastructure has been overwhelmed as a result of what’s occurred over the past year, and we’re still trying to catch up. So while it’s great results thus far, we’re far from saying that – mission accomplished.

ROSE: The administration wants Mexico to do even more. Mexican officials are in Washington this week for a meeting with Vice President Pence about what’s going to happen next.

MARTIN: All right. NPR’s Joel Rose. Thanks, Joel. We appreciate it.

ROSE: You’re welcome.

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

The Trump administration’s war on statistics is now threatening lives – The Washington Post

The Trump administration’s war on statistics is now threatening lives - The Washington Post nevin manimala
The Trump administration’s war on statistics is now threatening lives - The Washington Post nevin manimala
September 9 at 6:54 PM

First, they came for the unemployment rate, and we brushed it off as tinfoil-hat nonsense.

Then they came for crowd sizes, and we laughed at the absurdity.

The next victim was the deficit, which they said was shrinking even as we saw it rising; also climate data, which they denigrated, doctored or disappeared without a trace. But we said, eh, they always do that, no big deal.

They purged the data-crunchers who tabulate crop prices and other agricultural statistics, and we ignored it because we weren’t farmers. They even came for the yield curve, which they said hadn’t inverted when it had, but also that even  if  it did invert, the inversion would mean the opposite of what everyone knows it means.

Now, they’ve come for the weather forecast. And if earlier episodes in President Trump’s war on statistics threatened livelihoods, this one threatens lives.

For a week, Trump obsessively insisted that his errant tweet about Hurricane Dorian’s threat to Alabama was correct. The episode included a moment so ridiculous it would have been too broad even for the HBO comedy series “Veep”: Last Wednesday, Trump showed a hurricane map that had obviously been doctored with a Sharpie.

It was funny, telegenic, easy to grasp. So, understandably, Sharpiegate got news coverage up the wazoo. The more ominous developments in this saga, however, got significantly less attention. They happened the previous Sunday, when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) sent a secret agencywide directive warning its scientists not to contradict the president, and then the subsequent Friday, when NOAA released an unsigned statement backing Trump’s false forecast and disparaging its own scientists. It was reportedly sent after the commerce secretary threatened firings.

Sure, Trump’s attacks on objective statistics, scientists or really any independent source of accountability are nothing new. On the contrary, such attacks have become ubiquitous. Anyone who dares to produce or even accurately report on politically inconvenient metrics is allegedly participating in a vast anti-Trump conspiracy or is somehow rooting for America to fail.

And, at this point, media corrections of Trump’s false claims about stock performance, or air purity, or the strength of the manufacturing sector, can feel tedious, pedantic and exhausting. Trump’s just being Trump, pundits scold. We should all move on to “real” concerns rather than these distractions from whatever other horrible (or, depending on your viewpoint, wonderful) things the administration is doing.

But these are  real concerns. Trump’s attempted manipulations of official metrics — and the aspersions he casts upon metrics he cannot manipulate — degrade our democracy, economy and public safety.

Distrust in official data is deadly to voters’ ability to evaluate public policies, as well as the records of the officials crafting or overseeing those policies.

This numerical nihilism likewise wears on companies’ and households’ abilities to make informed and economically efficient decisions, something Trump’s billionaire Cabinet should appreciate.

And as illustrated by the administration’s insistence that even the weather report is fake, the erosion of trust in government data can also kill people.

The director of the National Weather Service gave a brave speech on Monday — at an annual meteorological meeting in Alabama, of all places. He noted that shortly after Trump’s initial Alabama hurricane tweet, the National Weather Service’s Birmingham office noticed its “phones and social media” light up with questions about Dorian. Without actually knowing what had triggered these worried inquiries, it tweeted  to assure the public that “Alabama will NOT see any impacts from #Dorian.”

“They did that with one thing in mind: public safety,” NWS Director Louis Uccellini said, defending the employees his superiors had attacked. “The Birmingham office did this to stop panic.”

After all, just as there are costs to failing to alert people about dangerous weather, so, too, are there costs to encouraging people to freak out about dangerous weather that doesn’t exist. For the National Weather Service, long-term credibility matters: If people come to believe the government hypes or even invents the risk of natural disaster, they might ignore those warnings next time there actually is significant risk of natural disaster.

This problem is not theoretical. It happened in Joplin, Mo., in 2011, when 158 people died from a powerful tornado despite National Weather Service warnings. A subsequent NOAA report found that the perceived frequency of tornado warning sirens had caused people to become “desensitized or complacent” and “not take protective action” until it was too late.

Just as we don’t want Americans to become “desensitized or complacent” about the risk of deadly weather, neither should we allow ourselves to become “desensitized or complacent” about the risk this president presents to one of our country’s most precious assets: reliable, trustworthy, nonpartisan public data.

WLPD Statistics from Home Opener – wlfi.com

WLPD Statistics from Home Opener - wlfi.com nevin manimala
WLPD Statistics from Home Opener - wlfi.com nevin manimala

Speech to Text for WLPD Statistics from Home Opener

Below is the closed-captioning text associated with this video. Since this uses automated speech to text spelling and grammar may not be accurate.

the neighborhood lockdown. 3 how about those boilermakers?! it was a great weekend for the first home game, and a win too.west lafayette police say it was also a win for officers. they say everyone was well-behaved this weekend.news 18’s isabella caruso spoke with officers this morning about the weekend statistics report.isabella there’s one thing officers told you was a bit surprising. 3 yes, lieutenant adam ferguson told me wlpd did not get any fight calls.he says that’s pretty unusual, especially with how many people were out this weekend.but he’s definitely not complaining, he says it’s great that everyone along.but overall, a very well-behaved home opener. 3 here’s a quick wrap-up of this weekend’s statistics- there were three arrests made. one was for operating while intoxicated.another was for driving while suspended.the last arrest was an employee theft at mcdonalds, which ferguson says is unrelated to game day activity.there were 215 calls total.36 of those included towing for vehicles parked on private property. there were 41 traffic stops made.16 noise complaints. ferguson explained to me that these numbers are normal.wlpd gathered these numbers starting at 7 p.m. on friday until 7 p.m. on sunday. 3 another great game-day report- this one coming from purdue police.they say the cherry lane extension helped a lot.cherry lane was extended through northwestern avenue leading to u.s. 231 over the summer.t change was meant to alleviate traffic headaches during football games.the new extension was utilized for the first time on saturday.with more than 50 thousand fans attending the game, the extension was also used an aid for pedestrians.police chief john cox says the cherry lane extension helped everything run smoothly. 3<“the intersection was extremely helpful in getting not only inbound traffic in but more importantly our outbound traffic pattern. and getting cars out onto to 231 so we can get them away from campus.”> 3 cox says the extensi also help smooth traffic patterns for students. 3 i asked lt. ferguson if the department was planning on making any changed based off of these numbers, and said wlpd will not be changing up much of their plan for game days.we can only hope that things run just as smoothly next weekend.purdue takes on texas christian university at 7:30 p.m. at ho saturday.reporting live in west lafayette, isabell caruso news 18.

Statistics of Otherness While Studying Abroad – The Yale Herald

Statistics of Otherness While Studying Abroad - The Yale Herald nevin manimala
Statistics of Otherness While Studying Abroad - The Yale Herald nevin manimala
  1. On an unreasonably warm day in Auvillar, France, seven (7) white people and one (1) yellow person — eight (8) beige-ish people cumulatively — look out at the Garonne river. Four (4) of these eight (8) are clearly tourists, three (3) of whom have cameras swinging from their necks and huddle together speaking French conspiratorially. The fourth (4th) tourist (coincidentally, the singular yellow person) dangles her legs from her vantage point on the overlook’s brick railing, munching on strawberries from the market.
  2. I am the fourth (4th) tourist.
  3. I don’t know how many people live in Auvillar. Maybe nine hundred (900)? Sure, let’s go with that.
  4. By now, Auvillar’s numbers have shifted to 920 because 20 newcomers (I count myself among them) have just moved into the gîte across from the art gallery. We are here for a college writing program and will be residents for the next month or so. Our demographics are:
  • 14 Yale students aged 18 to 21
  • our instructors (3)
  • our instructors’ spouses (2)
  • one (1) newborn baby named Adrian.

5. Amidst our ranks of fourteen (14), ten (10) of us are people of color. That seems like a large number. Imbalanced. But this same disproportionality is predicted for America herself in a few short years. White people (read: individuals of European descent) are soon going to be outnumbered by non-white people (read: individuals not of European descent). As a result, some Americans (read: the non-indigenous ones) are fearful, ready to pack their bags and move somewhere pure and Aryan like Auvillar, where white people are still the expectation.

6. Ten (10) years ago, Auvillar wasn’t as it is today, says Francis, our guide to the Valence d’Agen market. He has one (1) granddaughter who’s about to start nursery school, which worries him. Times have changed; there’s been an influx of North Africans (how many? Too many.) that has made France resemble “L.A. in the ’90s.” Once he notices the frosty reception to his statements, he pivots. He talks about his one (1) Mexican granddaughter and how her mother is beautiful — she’s 50 but looks 20.

7. One (1) of the town’s two (2) museums is called le Musée du vieil Auvillar. The museum is nostalgic, dedicated to conserving the “old Auvillar.”

8. Every year, Auvillar welcomes hundreds of strangers — pilgrims, walking the Camino — from June to October. Seventeen (17) pilgrim statues gripping walking sticks, tiny waists cinched by tiny seashell belts, stand sentry on ledges all across town. Clay representations of the glory in travel.

9. The gîte we’re inhabiting has furniture: two (2) chairs, one (1) table suspended the wrong-way-up from the ceiling. This décor is eccentric because the house’s owners are eccentric (a fully dressed mannequin we’ve named Marjorie startles all visitors to the living room). Entering this space, you might feel like you were the strange one, the one walking on ceilings. To be l’étranger is to accept being étrange. But not here; not in Auvillar. I speak the language, and the trees here — tall, maternal, branches bony like a piano-player’s fingers — remind me of New Hampshire.

10. New Hampshire was where I, who had grown up in China, first learned the politics of my difference. It was a state that was ninety-three (93) percent white, two (2) percent Asian. I felt like I had occupied so much of that two (2) percent when I was there. But still, I loved it. I loved the ponds gleaming with jagged skate marks in the winter, the tempura-crunch of the Mike & Sharie roll at the only Japanese restaurant in town I was willing to patronize. How the trees were exactly the kind one feels the strange child-like pull to climb.

11. An elderly couple — one (1) man, one (1) woman — openly watch me as I walk the streets of Auvillar. I wonder if it’s because they know I come from America or whether it’s simply because I look so different. What mental gymnastics does my existence inspire? Japonaise ou chinoise? they’d contemplate. Or they might just file me under the catch-all term “orientale.” I could be paranoid. Maybe they’re just wondering where I got this cool shirt from (Zara).

12. In a bustling market with twenty-nine (29) varieties of olives, there is one (1) stall that sells les plats cuisines asiatiques. Francis points it out to me. I smile supportively like, Yes, as I’m sure you can imagine, I do eat Asian food.

13. I don’t have much to say about Francis’s behavior. And I don’t feel angry, even though I know I’m entitled to be. I forgive him because I know he is only one (1) old French man (amongst millions). But also because he hasn’t been the only one (1):

a. I walk late-afternoon New Haven streets with friends. The sky hasn’t dimmed yet. We’re chatting, discussing this TV show we’ve been watching until a car window unfurls and somebody yells, “I’ve never had an Asian before!” We walk the rest of the way back to our dorms in startled silence.

b. A close friend jokes about my small eyes. Haha, how do you even see, haha. He laughs for a while after, his eyes ringing with good humor. Or something similar to good humor but not exactly it; I’m not sure.

c. I buy Haribo sour berries and honey yogurt from the campus grocery store at 11 p.m.. I head for the exit but I’m blocked by a squadron of drunk white boys. As they study me, my heart hammers hard in my ribcage, and I am suddenly hyper-aware that the Something-Terrible my mom always warned me about might just happen. “Hi, Asian girl,” one of them slurs, crooking a hand to touch my elbow. His palm is wet. I retreat rapidly as one of his friends pulls him back, chuckling — I push by them to get out the door, blood galloping to my ears. The evening wind is harsh and I return to my room, shivering.

14. I can never be angry at one (1) person in particular. Because it’s bigger than that. Bigger than Francis and bigger than Auvillar with its nine hundred (900) residents. After a certain point, anger no longer swells like welts on skin. Instead: it’s a tiredness that seeps into you. Watercolor folding through paper.

15. Maybe not having to be angry, fuming, positively enraged is a liberty.

16. I got to grow up, endure my growth spurt, nurture my first (1st) crush in a country where I looked like 1.4 billion others. A certain indissoluble understanding of who I am comes with that upbringing. Even when I was at school in New Hampshire, I got to go home for winter break. I’d board two (2) planes and 23 hours, four (4) meals, and seven (7) in-flight movies later, I’d have left that difference behind.

I know my worth.

17. I return to the one (1) stall in the market selling Asian food. Its offerings are greasier variations of the stir-fried noodles and spring rolls on which I was raised, but I recognize these foods nonetheless. What is referred to as mi xiao here (which sounds Chinese but isn’t) is also the shui jiao my mother would wrap on lazy afternoons. This is the food my people have adapted from their inherited cookbooks for the consumption of white people. This, right here, is marketing at its best.

18. I gaze at the array of food for a while. I catch a whiff of smells both tangy and sour. I make eye contact with the Asian man behind the cashier (read: comrade, fellow insider). “Bonjour,” I say, smiling.

19. “Bonjour,” he says right back. We stand there watching each other. Two (2) yellow people bonded by a frail thread of mutual gaze. Then it severs. His eyes fall to his goods, and I step back in sync with the twisting market crowd pushing forward.

20. I watch light catch on the Garonne’s waves as I eat my strawberries. Licking the pink wash from my fingers, I notice one (1) of the other tourists watching me. Maybe, to him, I am the real tourist attraction. I give him the benefit of the doubt. It’s an unreasonably sunny day and the brick is warm beneath my thighs. I eat my strawberries.