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Comparative Efficacy of Neoadjuvant Nivolumab Plus Chemotherapy versus Conventional Comparator Treatments in Resectable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Literature Review and Network Meta-Analysis

Cancers (Basel). 2024 Jul 8;16(13):2492. doi: 10.3390/cancers16132492.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to estimate the relative efficacy of neoadjuvant nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy (neoNIVO + CT) compared to relevant treatments amongst resectable non-metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (rNSCLC) patients.

METHODS: Treatment comparisons were based on a network meta-analysis (NMA) using randomized clinical trial data identified via systematic literature review (SLR). The outcomes of interest were event-free survival (EFS) and pathological complete response (pCR). NeoNIVO + CT was compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (neoCT), neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neoCRT), adjuvant chemotherapy (adjCT), and surgery alone (S). Due to the potential for effect modification by stage, all-stage and stage-specific networks were considered. Fixed-effect (FE) and random-effects Bayesian NMA models were run (EFS = hazard ratios [HR]; pCR = odds ratios [OR]; 95% credible intervals [CrI]).

RESULTS: Sixty-one RCTs were identified (base case = 9 RCTs [n = 1978 patients]). In the all-stages FE model, neoNIVO + CT had statistically significant EFS improvements relative to neoCT (HR = 0.68 [95% CrI: 0.49, 0.94]), S (0.59 [0.42, 0.82]), adjCT (0.66 [0.45, 0.96]), but not relative to neoCRT (HR = 0.77 [0.52, 1.16]). NeoNIVO + CT (5 RCTs) had statistically significant higher odds of pCR relative to neoCT (OR = 12.53 [5.60, 33.82]) and neoCRT (7.15 [2.31, 24.34]). Stage-specific model findings were consistent.

CONCLUSIONS: This NMA signals improved EFS and/or pCR of neoNIVO + CT relative to comparators among patients with rNSCLC.

PMID:39001554 | DOI:10.3390/cancers16132492

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A Probabilistic Approach to Estimate the Temporal Order of Pathway Mutations Accounting for Intra-Tumor Heterogeneity

Cancers (Basel). 2024 Jul 8;16(13):2488. doi: 10.3390/cancers16132488.

ABSTRACT

The development of cancer involves the accumulation of somatic mutations in several essential biological pathways. Delineating the temporal order of pathway mutations during tumorigenesis is crucial for comprehending the biological mechanisms underlying cancer development and identifying potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Several computational and statistical methods have been introduced for estimating the order of somatic mutations based on mutation profile data from a cohort of patients. However, one major issue of current methods is that they do not take into account intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), which limits their ability to accurately discern the order of pathway mutations. To address this problem, we propose PATOPAI, a probabilistic approach to estimate the temporal order of mutations at the pathway level by incorporating ITH information as well as pathway and functional annotation information of mutations. PATOPAI uses a maximum likelihood approach to estimate the probability of pathway mutational events occurring in a specific sequence, wherein it focuses on the orders that are consistent with the phylogenetic structure of the tumors. Applications to whole exome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) illustrate our method’s ability to recover the temporal order of pathway mutations in several cancer types.

PMID:39001551 | DOI:10.3390/cancers16132488

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Short- and Long-Term Advantages of Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Elderly Patients with Locally Advanced Cancer

Cancers (Basel). 2024 Jul 7;16(13):2477. doi: 10.3390/cancers16132477.

ABSTRACT

Minimally invasive surgery has provided several clinical advantages in locally advanced gastric cancer (LAGC) care, although a consensus on its application criteria remains unclear. Surgery remains a careful choice in elderly patients, who frequently present with frailty, comorbidities, and other disabling diseases. This study aims to assess the possible advantages of laparoscopic gastric resections in elderly patients presenting with LAGC. This retrospective study analyzed a single-center series of elderly patients (≥75 years) undergoing curative resections for LAGC between 2015 and 2020. A comparative analysis of open versus laparoscopic approaches was conducted, focusing on postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), and long-term survival. A total of 62 patients underwent gastrectomy through an open or a laparoscopic approach (31 pts each). The study population did not show statistically significant differences in demographics, operative risk, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The laparoscopic group reported significantly minimized overall complications (45.2 vs. 71%, p = 0.039) and pulmonary complications (0 vs. 9.7%, p = 0.038) as well as a shorter LOS (8 vs. 12 days, p = 0.007). Lymph node harvest was equal between the groups, although long-term overall survival presented significantly better after laparoscopic gastrectomy (p = 0.048), without a relevant difference in terms of disease-free and disease-specific survivals. Laparoscopic gastrectomy proves effective in elderly LAGC patients, offering substantial short- and long-term postoperative benefits.

PMID:39001540 | DOI:10.3390/cancers16132477

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Association of Serum Proteases and Acute Phase Factors Levels with Survival Outcomes in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

Cancers (Basel). 2024 Jul 6;16(13):2471. doi: 10.3390/cancers16132471.

ABSTRACT

Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents a substantial burden on global healthcare, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite advances in screening methodologies, its incidence remains high, necessitating continued efforts in early detection and treatment. Neoplastic invasion and metastasis are primary determinants of CRC lethality, emphasizing the urgency of understanding underlying mechanisms to develop effective therapeutic strategies. This study aimed to explore the potential of serum biomarkers in predicting survival outcomes in CRC patients, with a focus on cathepsin B (CB), leukocytic elastase (LE), total sialic acid (TSA), lipid-associated sialic acid (LASA), antitrypsin activity (ATA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and cystatin C (CC). We recruited 185 CRC patients and 35 healthy controls, assessing demographic variables, tumor characteristics, and 7 serum biomarker levels, including (1) CB, (2) LE, (3) TSA, (4) LASA, (5) ATA, (6) CRP, and (7) CC. Statistical analyses included ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc tests and MANOVA for continuous variables. Student’s t-test was used for dependent samples, while non-parametric tests like Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were applied for variables deviating from the normal distribution. Categorical variables were assessed using chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was utilized to examine variable correlations. Survival analysis employed the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test for comparing survival times between groups. Significant associations were observed between CB (p = 0.04), LE (p = 0.01), and TSA (p = 0.008) levels and survival outcomes in CRC patients. Dukes’ classification stages also showed a significant correlation with survival (p = 0.001). However, no significant associations were found for LASA, ATA, CRP, and CC. Multivariate analysis of LE, TSA, and ATA demonstrated a notable correlation with survival (p = 0.041), notwithstanding ATA’s lack of significance in univariate analysis (p = 0.13). CB, LE, and TSA emerged as promising diagnostic markers with prognostic value in CRC, potentially aiding in early diagnosis and treatment planning. Further research is needed to validate these findings and explore additional prognostic indicators.

PMID:39001534 | DOI:10.3390/cancers16132471

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Statistical Analysis of Gastric Cancer Cells Response to Broadband Terahertz Radiation with and without Contrast Nanoparticles

Cancers (Basel). 2024 Jul 4;16(13):2454. doi: 10.3390/cancers16132454.

ABSTRACT

The paper describes the statistical analysis of the response of gastric cancer cells and normal cells to broadband terahertz radiation up to 4 THz, both with and without the use of nanostructured contrast agents. The THz spectroscopy analysis was comparatively performed under the ATR procedure and transmission measurement procedure. The statistical analysis was conducted towards multiple pairwise comparisons, including a support medium (without cells) versus a support medium with nanoparticles, normal cells versus normal cells with nanoparticles, and, respectively, tumor cells versus tumor cells with nanoparticles. When generally comparing the ATR procedure and transmission measurement procedure for a broader frequency domain, the differentiation between normal and tumor cells in the presence of contrast agents is superior when using the ATR procedure. THz contrast enhancement by using contrast agents derived from MRI-related contrast agents leads to only limited benefits and only for narrow THz frequency ranges, a disadvantage for THz medical imaging.

PMID:39001516 | DOI:10.3390/cancers16132454

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The Use of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values for Differentiating Bevacizumab-Related Cytotoxicity from Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis in Glioblastoma

Cancers (Basel). 2024 Jul 2;16(13):2440. doi: 10.3390/cancers16132440.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most common primary invasive neoplasms of the brain. Distinguishing between lesion recurrence and different types of treatment related changes in patients with GBM remains challenging using conventional MRI imaging techniques. Therefore, accurate and precise differentiation between true progression or pseudoresponse is crucial in deciding on the appropriate course of treatment. This retrospective study investigated the potential of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map values derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as a noninvasive method to increase diagnostic accuracy in treatment response.

METHODS: A cohort of 21 glioblastoma patients (mean age: 59.2 ± 11.8, 12 Male, 9 Female) that underwent treatment with bevacizumab were selected. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI images obtained from a standardized brain protocol across 1.5-T and 3-T MRI scanners. Ratios were calculated for rADC values. Lesions were classified as bevacizumab-induced cytotoxicity based on characteristic imaging features (well-defined regions of restricted diffusion with persistent diffusion restriction over the course of weeks without tissue volume loss and absence of contrast enhancement). The rADC value was compared to these values in radiation necrosis and recurrent lesions, which were concluded in our prior study. The nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test with p < 0.05 was used for significance.

RESULTS: The mean ± SD age of the selected patients was 59.2 ± 11.8. ADC values and corresponding mean rADC values for bevacizumab-induced cytotoxicity were 248.1 ± 67.2 and 0.39 ± 0.10, respectively. These results were compared to the ADC values and corresponding mean rADC values of tumor progression and radiation necrosis. Significant differences between rADC values were observed in all three groups (p < 0.001). Bevacizumab-induced cytotoxicity had statistically significant lower ADC values compared to both tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis.

CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates the potential of ADC values as noninvasive imaging biomarkers for differentiating recurrent glioblastoma from radiation necrosis and bevacizumab-induced cytotoxicity.

PMID:39001500 | DOI:10.3390/cancers16132440

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An analysis of potentially avoidable neurosurgical transfers to a tertiary-care level I trauma center

J Neurosurg. 2024 Jul 12:1-7. doi: 10.3171/2024.4.JNS24256. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Previous studies of neurosurgical transfers indicate that substantial numbers of patients may not need to be transferred, suggesting an opportunity to provide more patient-centered care by treating patients in their communities, while probably saving thousands of dollars in transport and duplicative workup. This study of neurosurgical transfers, the largest to date, aimed to better characterize how often transfers were potentially avoidable and which patient factors might affect whether transfer is needed.

METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of neurosurgical transfers to an urban, tertiary-care, level I trauma center between October 1, 2017, and October 1, 2022. Prior to data analysis, the authors devised criteria to differentiate necessary neurosurgical transfers from potentially avoidable ones. A transfer was considered necessary if 1) the patient went to the operating room within 12 hours of arrival at the emergency department (ED); 2) a neurological MRI study was conducted in the ED; 3) the patient was admitted to the ICU from the ED; or 4) the patient was admitted to either neurology or a surgical service (including neurosurgery). Transfers not meeting any of the above criteria were deemed potentially avoidable. Patient and clinical characteristics, including diagnostic groupings from Clinical Classification Software categories, were collected retrospectively via electronic health record data abstraction and stratified by whether the transfer was necessary or potentially avoidable. Statistical differences were assessed with a chi-square test.

RESULTS: A total of 5113 neurosurgical transfers were included in the study, of which 1701 (33.3%) were classified as potentially avoidable. Four percent of all transferred patients went to the operating room within 12 hours of reaching the receiving ED, 23.4% were admitted to the ICU from the ED, 26.6% had a neurological MRI study performed in the ED, and 54.4% were admitted to a surgical service or to neurology. Potentially avoidable transfers had a higher proportion of traumatic brain injury, headache, and syncope (p < 0.0001), as well as of spondylopathies/spondyloarthropathies (p = 0.0402), whereas patients needing transfer had a higher proportion of acute hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease and cerebral infarction (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that a large number of neurosurgical transfers can probably be treated in their home hospitals and highlights that the vast majority of patients transferred for neurosurgical conditions do not receive emergency neurosurgery. Further research is needed to better guide transferring and receiving facilities in reducing the burden of excessive transfers.

PMID:38996404 | DOI:10.3171/2024.4.JNS24256

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Derivation of the Quebec Brain Injury Categories for complicated mild traumatic brain injuries

J Neurosurg. 2024 Jul 12:1-9. doi: 10.3171/2024.4.JNS24183. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Approximately 10% of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) present with intracranial bleeding, and only 3.5% eventually require neurosurgical intervention, which often necessitates interhospital transfer. Better guidelines and recommendations are needed to manage complicated mild TBI in the emergency department (ED). The main objective of this study was to derive a clinical decision rule, the Quebec Brain Injury Categories (QueBIC), to predict the risk of adverse outcomes for complicated mild TBI in the ED. The secondary objective was to compare the QueBIC’s performance with those of other existing guidelines.

METHODS: The authors conducted a retrospective multicenter cohort study in 3 level I trauma centers. Consecutive patients with complicated mild TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 13-15) who were aged ≥ 16 years were included. The primary outcome was a combination of neurosurgical intervention, mild TBI-related death, and clinical deterioration. Statistical analyses included set covering machine analyses.

RESULTS: In total, 477 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 62.9 years, and 68.1% were male. The algorithm classified patients into three risk categories (low, moderate, and high risk). The high-risk group (128 patients) (subdural hemorrhage [SDH] width > 7 mm or any midline shift) presented a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI 71%-93%) and a specificity of 80% (95% CI 76%-84%) to detect neurosurgical intervention and mild TBI-related death, leaving 8 undetected cases. Patients in the moderate-risk group (169 patients) had at least 1 variable: SDH width > 4 mm, initial GCS score ≤ 14, > 1 intraparenchymal hemorrhage, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage width > 4 mm. The combined QueBIC high- and moderate-risk category had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI 63%-100%) and a specificity of 53% (95% CI 47%-58%) to detect mild TBI-related death or neurosurgical intervention. The sensitivity and specificity values for clinical deterioration when no death or neurosurgical intervention occurred were 81% (95% CI 64%-93%) and 44% (95% CI 39%-49%), respectively. The remaining 180 patients (37.7%) did not meet any high-risk or moderate-risk criteria and were considered low risk. None had neurosurgical intervention or mild TBI-related death. Only 6 (3.3%) low-risk patients showed clinical deterioration.

CONCLUSIONS: QueBIC is a safe and effective tool to guide the management of patients presenting to the ED with complicated mild TBI. It accurately identifies patients at low risk for specialized neurotrauma or neurosurgical care. Further validation is required before its use in EDs.

PMID:38996397 | DOI:10.3171/2024.4.JNS24183

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Does the Application of Topical Vancomycin Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Spine Surgery? A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2024 Jul 12. doi: 10.1097/CORR.0000000000003179. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgical site infections (SSIs) represent a major challenge in spine surgery, leading to severe morbidity, mortality, and increased costs. The local application of antibiotics, particularly vancomycin, has emerged as a potential strategy. Individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have disagreed about the efficacy of topical vancomycin in preventing SSIs after spine surgery, and so a meta-analysis that pools data from those RCTs might be helpful to inform clinicians’ decisions on the topic.

QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: This meta-analysis of RCTs asked: Does intrawound topical vancomycin reduce the risk of (1) SSIs, (2) deep SSIs, and (3) superficial SSIs in patients undergoing spine surgery?

METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar (pages 1-20) were searched up through March 13, 2024 (search performed on March 13, 2024). Inclusion criteria consisted of English or non-English-language RCTs comparing the implementation of topical vancomycin in spine surgery to its nonuse and assessing its efficacy in preventing SSI, while exclusion criteria consisted of nonrandomized comparative studies, single-arm noncomparative studies, comparative studies based on national databases or from the same center as other included studies, studies posted to preprint servers, studies reporting incomplete/nonrelevant outcomes, and studies adding another SSI preventive measure. The studies were assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Heterogeneity was evaluated by Q tests and I2 statistics. We used a random-effects model when considerable heterogeneity was observed (all SSIs, deep SSIs); otherwise, a fixed-effects model was used (all SSIs subanalysis, superficial SSIs). Furthermore, the fragility index was calculated for each of the assessed outcomes when there was no difference between the two groups to assess how many patients were needed to experience the outcomes for a difference to become present. The studied outcomes were the risks of SSIs, deep SSIs, and superficial SSIs. Deep SSIs were defined by the included trials as SSIs underneath the fascia, otherwise they were considered superficial. Six RCTs representing a total of 2140 patients were included, with 1053 patients in the vancomycin group and 1087 in the control group. Using an alpha of 0.05, our meta-analysis had 80% power to detect a risk difference of 1.5% for the primary outcome between patients who did and did not receive vancomycin. The age of the patients in the vancomycin group ranged from 37 to 52 years, while the age in the control group ranged from 34 to 52 years. The surgical procedures consisted of both instrumented and noninstrumented spinal procedures. Overall, the risk of bias in the included studies was either low or unclear, with none of the studies having a high risk of bias in any of the assessed categories (selection bias, performance bias, detection bias, attrition bias, and reporting bias).

RESULTS: We found no difference in the risk of SSI between the vancomycin and control groups (3.0% [32 of 1053] versus 3.9% [42 of 1087], relative risk 0.74 [95% CI 0.35 to 1.57]; p = 0.43). Ten additional patients (4.8% infection risk) in the control group would need to experience an SSI for a difference to be observed between the two groups. We found no difference in the risk of deep SSI between the vancomycin and control groups (1.8% [15 of 812] versus 2.7% [23 of 860], relative risk 0.69 [95% CI 0.24 to 2.00]; p = 0.50). Seven additional patients (3.5% infection risk) in the control group would need to experience a deep SSI for a difference to be observed between the two groups. We found no difference in the risk of superficial SSI between the vancomycin and control groups (1.0% [6 of 620] versus 1.4% [9 of 662], relative risk 0.68 [95% CI 0.25 to 1.89]; p = 0.46). Seven additional patients (2.4% infection risk) in the control group would need to experience a superficial SSI for a difference to be observed between the two groups.

CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis of randomized trials examining use of topical vancomycin in spine surgery failed to show efficacy in reducing infection, and thus we do not recommend routine use of topical vancomycin for this indication. Future large-scale trials would be needed if surgeons believe that between-group differences smaller than those for which we were powered here (this meta-analysis had 80% power to detect a between-group difference of 1.5% in infection risk) are clinically important, and large database surveys may be informative in terms of assessing for postoperative adverse events associated with the use of vancomycin powder.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level I, therapeutic study.

PMID:38996386 | DOI:10.1097/CORR.0000000000003179

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What Are the Sex-Based Differences of Acetabular Coverage Features in Hip Dysplasia?

Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2024 Jul 12. doi: 10.1097/CORR.0000000000003126. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eccentric rotational acetabular osteotomy is performed to prevent osteoarthritis caused by developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). To achieve sufficient acetabular coverage, understanding the characteristics of acetabular coverage in DDH is necessary. However, the features of acetabular coverage in males with DDH remain unclear. We thought that the differences in acetabular coverage between females and males might be associated with the differences in pelvic morphology between the sexes.

QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) What are the differences in the acetabular coverage between females and males with DDH? (2) What are the differences in the rotations of the ilium and ischium between females and males with DDH? (3) What is the relationship between the rotation of the ilium and ischium and the acetabular coverage at each height in females and males with DDH?

METHODS: Between 2016 and 2023, 114 patients (138 hips) underwent eccentric rotational acetabular osteotomy at our hospital. We excluded patients with Tönnis Grade 2 or higher, a lateral center-edge angle of 25º or more, and deformities of the pelvis or femur, resulting in 100 patients (122 hips) being included. For female patients (98 hips), the median (range) age was 40 years (10 to 58), and for the male patients (24 hips), it was 31 years (14 to 53). We used all patients’ preoperative AP radiographs and CT data. The crossover sign, posterior wall sign, and pelvic width index were evaluated in AP radiographs. The rotation of the innominate bone in the axial plane was evaluated at two different heights, specifically at the slice passing through the anterior superior iliac spine and the slice through the pubic symphysis and ischial spine in CT data. Furthermore, we evaluated the anterior and posterior acetabular sector angles. Comparisons of variables related to innominate bone measurements and acetabular coverage measurements between females and males in each patient were performed. The correlations between pelvic morphology measurements and acetabular coverage were evaluated separately for females and males, and the results were subsequently compared to identify any sex-specific differences. For continuous variables, we used the Student t-test; for binary variables, we used the Fisher exact test. A p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULTS: In the evaluation of AP radiographs, an indicator of acetabular retroversion-the crossover sign-showed no differences between the sexes, whereas the posterior wall sign (females 46% [45 of 98] hips versus males 75% [18 of 24] hips, OR 3.50 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20 to 11.71]; p = 0.01) and pelvic width index less than 56% (females 1% [1 of 98] versus males 17% [4 of 24], OR 18.71 [95% CI 1.74 to 958.90]; p = 0.005) occurred more frequently in males than in females. There were no differences in the iliac rotation parameters, but the ischium showed more external rotation in males (females 30° ± 2° versus males 24° ± 1°; p < 0.001). Regarding acetabular coverage, no differences between females and males were observed in the anterior acetabular sector angles. In contrast, males showed smaller values than females for the posterior acetabular sector angles (85° ± 9° versus 91° ± 7°; p = 0.002). In females, a correlation was observed between iliac rotation and acetabular sector angles (anterior acetabular sector angles: r = -0.35 [95% CI -0.05 to 0.16]; p < 0.001, posterior acetabular sector angles: r = 0.42 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.57]; p < 0.001). Similarly, ischial rotation showed a correlation with both acetabular sector angles (anterior acetabular sector angles: r = -0.34 [95% CI -0.51 to -0.15]; p < 0.001 and posterior acetabular sector angles: r = 0.45 [95% CI 0.27 to 0.59]; p < 0.001). Thus, in females, we observed that external iliac rotation and ischial internal rotation correlated with increased anterior acetabular coverage and reduced posterior coverage. In contrast, although acetabular coverage in males showed a correlation with iliac rotation (anterior acetabular sector angles: r = -0.55 [95% CI -0.78 to -0.18]; p = 0.006 and posterior acetabular sector angles: r = 0.74 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.88]; p < 0.001), no correlation was observed with ischial rotation.

CONCLUSION: In males, acetabular retroversion occurs more commonly than in females and is attributed to their reduced posterior acetabular coverage. In females, an increase in the posterior acetabular coverage was correlated with the external rotation angle of the ischium, whereas in males, no correlation was found between ischial rotation and posterior acetabular coverage. In treating males with DDH via eccentric rotational acetabular osteotomy, it is essential to adjust bone fragments to prevent inadequate posterior acetabular coverage. Future studies might need to investigate the differences in acetabular coverage between males and females in various limb positions and consider the direction of bone fragment rotation.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Our findings suggest that males with DDH exhibit acetabular retroversion more frequently than females, which is attributed to the reduced posterior acetabular coverage observed in males. The smaller posterior acetabular coverage in males might be related to differences in ischial morphology between sexes. During eccentric rotational acetabular osteotomy for males with DDH, adequately rotating acetabular bone fragments might be beneficial to compensate for deficient posterior acetabular coverage.

PMID:38996383 | DOI:10.1097/CORR.0000000000003126