New statistics: the government is separating 65 children a day from parents at the border

New statistics: the government is separating 65 children a day from parents at the border statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

Trump administration officials said Tuesday that 2,342 children have been separated from 2,206 parents at the US-Mexico border between May 5 and June 9 as part of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy of prosecuting people who cross the border illegally.

New statistics: the government is separating 65 children a day from parents at the border statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

New statistics: the government is separating 65 children a day from parents at the border statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

Javier Zarracina/Vox

The new numbers are the best indication of how many families have been separated since Attorney General Jeff Sessions and officials from the Department of Homeland Security announced their “zero tolerance” policy in early May.

Last week, the government declared that 1,995 children had been separated from their parents from April 19 to May 31 — an average of 46 a day. But that included a few weeks before the “zero tolerance” policy was in full effect. The new numbers, which fit pretty neatly into the amount of time that the policy has been in place, show that under “zero tolerance,” an average of 65 children have been separated from parents each day.

The parents have been referred for prosecution in criminal court — overwhelmingly for the misdemeanor offense of entering the country illegally for the first time — while the children are reclassified as “unaccompanied alien children” and sent into the care of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, part of the Department of Health and Human Services.

Some of those children are being placed in temporary facilities, and HHS is trying to find and build new ones — including new “soft-sided shelters” on military bases in Texas, which press reports have referred to as “tent cities.” Those aren’t intended to house children indefinitely; they’re intended to be used in the short term as HHS officials attempt to find a sponsor for the child, such as a relative or close friend, or shift the child to alternative long-term care in a licensed facility.

Steven Wagner, the acting assistant secretary for the Administration for Children and Families — the HHS division that includes the Office of Refugee Resettlement — said on a Tuesday call with reporters that the new “soft-sided” shelters will be used only to house teens, not younger children. (In reply to a question about where girls and young children are being kept — since reporters have only been allowed into facilities housing boys 10 or older — DHS said that they’ll have new footage of facilities in the next 48 hours.)

Wagner told reporters that while his department is “under a legal obligation” to place children “expeditiously” with a sponsor, “we actually don’t have a time limit in terms of days” that children are allowed to stay in HHS care.

Furthermore, he implied that even when separated children have relatives in the US, HHS will still keep them in custody — in a facility close to where their parents are being detained — if it thinks it has a chance of reuniting the family eventually.

“Our overwhelming objective,” Wagner said, “when we’re aware of the presence of a parent in the United States, is to reunite (the child) with the parent,” even if that means waiting for the parent to get out of detention, either on bond or upon being deported.

Wagner was unable to say how many separated children have been placed with sponsors or reunited with their parents. “This policy is still relatively new,” he said. “We are still working through the process of reuniting kids with their parents after adjudication.” In other words, reuniting them after the parent’s full asylum case has been completed, which can take months or years.

An ICE spokesperson told Adolfo Flores of BuzzFeed on Monday that “reunification typically does not occur until the removal stage of the process.” A lawyer for the law firm Jones Day working on behalf of families seeking asylum told the New York Times that “some of the women we have encountered in detention at the border have reported facing pressure to deport voluntarily in order to be reunified with their children.” But lawyers also report that parents are being deported alone.

CORRECTION: This article originally misreported the author’s own math to say that an average of 60 children, rather than 65, were being separated. The author apologizes for accidentally understating the scope of the issue.

statistics; +349 new citations

statistics; +349 new citations Report, nevin_manimala, linkedin, google_plus
statistics; +349 new citations Report, nevin_manimala, linkedin, google_plus

Feitosa MF, Kraja AT, Chasman DI, Sung YJ, Winkler TW, Ntalla I, Guo X, Franceschini N, Cheng CY, Sim X, Vojinovic D, Marten J, Musani SK, Li C, Bentley AR, Brown MR, Schwander K, Richard MA, Noordam R, Aschard H, Bartz TM, Bielak LF, Dorajoo R, Fisher V, Hartwig FP, Horimoto ARVR, Lohman KK, Manning AK, Rankinen T, Smith AV, Tajuddin SM, Wojczynski MK, Alver M, Boissel M, Cai Q, Campbell A, Chai JF, Chen X, Divers J, Gao C, Goel A, Hagemeijer Y, Harris SE, He M, Hsu FC, Jackson AU, Kähönen M, Kasturiratne A, Komulainen P, Kühnel B, Laguzzi F, Luan J, Matoba N, Nolte IM, Padmanabhan S, Riaz M, Rueedi R, Robino A, Said MA, Scott RA, Sofer T, Stančáková A, Takeuchi F, Tayo BO, van der Most PJ, Varga TV, Vitart V, Wang Y, Ware EB, Warren HR, Weiss S, Wen W, Yanek LR, Zhang W, Zhao JH, Afaq S, Amin N, Amini M, Arking DE, Aung T, Boerwinkle E, Borecki I, Broeckel U, Brown M, Brumat M, Burke GL, Canouil M, Chakravarti A, Charumathi S, Ida Chen YD, Connell JM, Correa A, de Las Fuentes L, de Mutsert R, de Silva HJ, Deng X, Ding J, Duan Q, Eaton CB, Ehret G, Eppinga RN, Evangelou E, Faul JD, Felix SB, Forouhi NG, Forrester T, Franco OH, Friedlander Y, Gandin I, Gao H, Ghanbari M, Gigante B, Gu CC, Gu D, Hagenaars SP, Hallmans G, Harris TB, He J, Heikkinen S, Heng CK, Hirata M, Howard BV, Ikram MA; InterAct Consortium, John U, Katsuya T, Khor CC, Kilpeläinen TO, Koh WP, Krieger JE, Kritchevsky SB, Kubo M, Kuusisto J, Lakka TA, Langefeld CD, Langenberg C, Launer LJ, Lehne B, Lewis CE, Li Y, Lin S, Liu J, Liu J, Loh M, Louie T, Mägi R, McKenzie CA, Meitinger T, Metspalu A, Milaneschi Y, Milani L, Mohlke KL, Momozawa Y, Nalls MA, Nelson CP, Sotoodehnia N, Norris JM, O’Connell JR, Palmer ND, Perls T, Pedersen NL, Peters A, Peyser PA, Poulter N, Raffel LJ, Raitakari OT, Roll K, Rose LM, Rosendaal FR, Rotter JI, Schmidt CO, Schreiner PJ, Schupf N, Scott WR, Sever PS, Shi Y, Sidney S, Sims M, Sitlani CM, Smith JA, Snieder H, Starr JM, Strauch K, Stringham HM, Tan NYQ, Tang H, Taylor KD, Teo YY, Tham YC, Turner ST, Uitterlinden AG, Vollenweider P, Waldenberger M, Wang L, Wang YX, Wei WB, Williams C, Yao J, Yu C, Yuan JM, Zhao W, Zonderman AB, Becker DM, Boehnke M, Bowden DW, Chambers JC, Deary IJ, Esko T, Farrall M, Franks PW, Freedman BI, Froguel P, Gasparini P, Gieger C, Jonas JB, Kamatani Y, Kato N, Kooner JS, Kutalik Z, Laakso M, Laurie CC, Leander K, Lehtimäki T, Study LC, Magnusson PKE, Oldehinkel AJ, Penninx BWJH, Polasek O, Porteous DJ, Rauramaa R, Samani NJ, Scott J, Shu XO, van der Harst P, Wagenknecht LE, Wareham NJ, Watkins H, Weir DR, Wickremasinghe AR, Wu T, Zheng W, Bouchard C, Christensen K, Evans MK, Gudnason V, Horta BL, Kardia SLR, Liu Y, Pereira AC, Psaty BM, Ridker PM, van Dam RM, Gauderman WJ, Zhu X, Mook-Kanamori DO, Fornage M, Rotimi CN, Cupples LA, Kelly TN, Fox ER, Hayward C, van Duijn CM, Tai ES, Wong TY, Kooperberg C, Palmas W, Rice K, Morrison AC, Elliott P, Caulfield MJ, Munroe PB, Rao DC, Province MA, Levy D.

PLoS One. 2018 Jun 18;13(6):e0198166. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0198166. eCollection 2018.

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Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrong

Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrong science, nevin_manimala, google plus
Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrong science, nevin_manimala, google plus

When it comes to understanding what makes people tick — and get sick — medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. But new research led by the University of California, Berkeley, suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark.

That’s largely because emotions, behavior and physiology vary markedly from one person to the next and one moment to the next. So averaging out data collected from a large group of human subjects at a given instant offers only a snapshot, and a fuzzy one at that, researchers said.

The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, have implications for everything from mining social media data to customizing health therapies, and could change the way researchers and clinicians analyze, diagnose and treat mental and physical disorders.

“If you want to know what individuals feel or how they become sick, you have to conduct research on individuals, not on groups,” said study lead author Aaron Fisher, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley. “Diseases, mental disorders, emotions, and behaviors are expressed within individual people, over time. A snapshot of many people at one moment in time can’t capture these phenomena.”

Moreover, the consequences of continuing to rely on group data in the medical, social and behavioral sciences include misdiagnoses, prescribing the wrong treatments and generally perpetuating scientific theory and experimentation that is not properly calibrated to the differences between individuals, Fisher said.

That said, a fix is within reach: “People shouldn’t necessarily lose faith in medical or social science,” he said. “Instead, they should see the potential to conduct scientific studies as a part of routine care. This is how we can truly personalize medicine.”

Plus, he noted, “modern technologies allow us to collect many observations per person relatively easily, and modern computing makes the analysis of these data possible in ways that were not possible in the past.”

Fisher and fellow researchers at Drexel University in Philadelphia and the University of Groningen in the Netherlands used statistical models to compare data collected on hundreds of people, including healthy individuals and those with disorders ranging from depression and anxiety to post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder.

In six separate studies they analyzed data via online and smartphone self-report surveys, as well as electrocardiogram tests to measure heart rates. The results consistently showed that what’s true for the group is not necessarily true for the individual.

For example, a group analysis of people with depression found that they worry a great deal. But when the same analysis was applied to each individual in that group, researchers discovered wide variations that ranged from zero worrying to agonizing well above the group average.

Moreover, in looking at the correlation between fear and avoidance — a common association in group research — they found that for many individuals, fear did not cause them to avoid certain activities, or vice versa.

“Fisher’s findings clearly imply that capturing a person’s own processes as they fluctuate over time may get us far closer to individualized treatment,” said UC Berkeley psychologist Stephen Hinshaw, an expert in psychopathology and faculty member of the department’s clinical science program.

In addition to Fisher, co-authors of the study are John Medaglia at Drexel University and Bertus Jeronimus at the University of Groningen.

How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition

How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus
How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen speaks during a White House news briefing on Monday. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg)

Conscripted by the White House to answer questions about the change in immigration policy that has resulted in a surge of children being separated from their families, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen denied that the children were being used as political pawns when asked by a reporter at the daily news briefing.

“The kids are being used as pawns by the smugglers and the traffickers,” Nielsen said.

She repeated a data point that she had mentioned earlier, a data point that Nielsen suggested necessitated taking a zero-tolerance approach to families arriving at the border.

“Again, let’s just pause to think about this statistic: 314 percent increase in adults showing up with kids that are not a family unit,” she said. “Those are traffickers, those are smugglers, that is MS-13, those are criminals, those are abusers.”

The White House liked this line so much that it tweeted it out — but there’s important context missing. Those may be smugglers and abusers, but they are also only a tiny fraction of the family units apprehended during the period at issue.

A DHS representative provided The Washington Post with the hard numbers behind Nielsen’s statistic. There were 46 cases of fraud — “individuals using minors to pose as fake family units” — in fiscal 2017, the period from October 2016 through September 2017. In the first five months of 2018, there were 191 cases.

That is an increase of 315 percent.

How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

But is that a significant increase or not? It depends on the pool of families approaching the border. If you have $500 in a bank account, paying $191 in fees as opposed to $46 is a big jump. If you have $5 million in the bank account, it’s a bit less of a bite.

DHS releases monthly data on the number of family units apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border. It was an increase in that figure in March and April that apparently helped spur the new emphasis on curtailing family arrivals.

How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

So we know the size of each pool. There were 75,622 family units apprehended at the border in fiscal 2017, and 31,102 in the first five months of this fiscal year.

How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

How many alleged smugglers are in that pool? Here, let’s visualize it.

How to mislead with statistics, DHS Secretary Nielsen edition statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

Even given the increased number of alleged smugglers this fiscal year and the decreased number of family units, those smugglers, those traffickers, those MS-13 members make up only 0.61 percent of the total number of family units apprehended at the border. In other words, for every 1,000 families that approached the border in the first five months of this fiscal year, only six allegedly involved individuals pretending to be a child’s parents. The percentage of alleged smugglers in fiscal 2017 was smaller, at 0.1 percent.

It’s not clear that all of those alleged smugglers were at the southwestern border. It’s not clear if more alleged smugglers are usually caught at the beginning of fiscal years. It’s not clear that all of those caught in fiscal 2018 were criminal smugglers or traffickers. What is clear is that they made up a very small percentage of the total population of family units.

We noted Monday morning that the argument that separating children from parents to catch smugglers had been re-embraced by the administration. When Attorney General Jeff Sessions first announced the family-separation policy, he predicated it explicitly on fears of smuggling.

“If you’re smuggling a child, then we’re going to prosecute you, and that child will be separated from you, probably, as required by law,” he said. “If you don’t want your child separated, then don’t bring them across the border illegally. It’s not our fault that somebody does that.”

What Sessions didn’t say in his speech is that, if you’re one of the 994 families that actually consists of a parent and a child, that isn’t a smuggler — your child will be separated from you anyway.

statistics; +25 new citations

statistics; +25 new citations Report, nevin_manimala, linkedin, google_plus
statistics; +25 new citations Report, nevin_manimala, linkedin, google_plus

Dreno B, Thompson JF, Smithers BM, Santinami M, Jouary T, Gutzmer R, Levchenko E, Rutkowski P, Grob JJ, Korovin S, Drucis K, Grange F, Machet L, Hersey P, Krajsova I, Testori A, Conry R, Guillot B, Kruit WHJ, Demidov L, Thompson JA, Bondarenko I, Jaroszek J, Puig S, Cinat G, Hauschild A, Goeman JJ, van Houwelingen HC, Ulloa-Montoya F, Callegaro A, Dizier B, Spiessens B, Debois M, Brichard VG, Louahed J, Therasse P, Debruyne C, Kirkwood JM.

Lancet Oncol. 2018 Jun 13. pii: S1470-2045(18)30254-7. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30254-7. [Epub ahead of print]

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Trump says crime in Germany is way up. German statistics show the opposite.

Trump says crime in Germany is way up. German statistics show the opposite. statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus
Trump says crime in Germany is way up. German statistics show the opposite. statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus
From left: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Trump and Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte at the Group of Seven summit in Canada. (Ian Langsdon/Pool photo via AFP/Getty Images)

In the midst of a domestic battle over his own administration’s strict immigration policy, President Trump took aim at Germany’s Angela Merkel on Monday — arguing in a tweet that the German chancellor’s more open policies toward migration and refugees have led to a crisis in her government coalition.

But in making his argument against Merkel’s “big mistake,” Trump claimed that crime in Germany was “way up.”

Trump followed up this tweet with another on Tuesday, claiming that “officials do not want to report” that crime in Germany is up 10 percent. The U.S. president did not provide a source for this claim.

That claim is not supported by recent statistics. In fact, reported crime in Germany was down by 10 percent last year, according to publicly available statistics. And notably, Merkel’s biggest challenger on immigration policy is on record as saying just last month that crime in Germany was the lowest it has been in decades.

Interior Minister Horst Seehofer released new crime figures in May that pointed to an overall decline in Germany during the past year. The figures showed that 5.76 million crimes were reported in 2017 — a drop of 10 percent from 2016 and the lowest number since 1992. Given the increases in Germany’s population, Seehofer told reporters in Berlin, this meant that Germany’s reported crime rate was at the lowest it has been for three decades.

To put it simply, “Germany has become safer,” Seehofer said.

Seehofer is the leader of the Christian Social Union (CSU), a hard-right Bavarian party that has long been a crucial coalition partner for Merkel’s center-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU). In defiance of the German chancellor, Seehofer is seeking to impose new border controls on the country — a move that could cause her coalition government to collapse.

Late on Monday, after the U.S. president’s tweet, Seehofer offered Merkel a temporary reprieve and said he would not implement the new controls for two weeks. That could allow Merkel to reach deals with other European nations on migration, rather than unilaterally turn back migrants at the border.

Trump has a history of tweeting inaccurate statements about crime and immigration in Europe. However, it may not be surprising that Trump sees crime rising in Germany when in fact it appears to be falling — a considerable number of Germans feel the same way. One poll conducted in April, for example, found that 41 percent of the country felt that they were less safe in public spaces than five years ago. Fifty-one percent, however, felt nothing had changed.

A study from last year found that much of the blame lay with media organizations, which often tend to focus on migrant-related crime rather than crime by German citizens.

A close reading of German crime statistics does offer a complicated picture of crime trends. There has been a sharp rise in the number of non-German suspects interviewed by police in Germany over the past five years, for example. And although violent crime dropped 2.4 percent last year, it had already risen by 6.7 percent between 2015 and 2016.

There is certainly no doubt that the wave of more than a million refugees and migrants who arrived in Germany in 2015 and 2016 changed the country, resulting in strained relations between German citizens and their new guests. However, despite concern about immigration, Merkel probably remains Germany’s most popular political leader, with a 50 percent approval rating this month.

Trump, meanwhile, continues to be viewed negatively by many Germans. In the same poll that reported Merkel’s high approval rating, 87 percent of Germans surveyed expressed concern that the U.S. leader was exacerbating international conflicts.

More on WorldViews

Trump’s comments about gun laws in Britain and France prompt anger and rebukes

This post has been updated to reflect President Trump’s new tweet and correct an error that suggested that reported crimes in Germany had dropped by 5 percent, when in fact they had dropped by 10 percent.

Vital Statistics: June 18, 2018

Vital Statistics: June 18, 2018 statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus
Vital Statistics: June 18, 2018 statistics, nevin_manimala, mathematics, math, linkedin, google_plus

MARRIAGE LICENSES

MARRIAGE LICENSES ISSUED BETWEEN JUNE 4 AND JUNE 8

Acks, Joann Mary, 44, 1957 W. 34th St.; Mezzacapo, John Matthew, 49, 1957 W. 34th St.

Ardillo, Amanda Lynn, 34, 1407 High St.; Nitkiewicz, Dustin Alan, 34, 1407 High St.

Babkina, Marina Borisovna, 21, 308 W. 21 St.; Burykin, Mikhail Genadiovich, 28, 10282 N. Park Drive, Lake City.

Brunst, Cody L., 25, 19125 Vrooman Road, Spartansburg; Shetler, Taneeka Kay, 24, 19125 Vrooman Road, Spartansburg.

Catalfu, Taylor Leigh, 27, 34 Circuit St., Apt 21, Waterford; Savko, Douglas James, 27, 34 Circuit St., Apt 21, Waterford.

Chaffee, Kelsie Marie, 23, 10955 Cross Station Road, Girard; Spencer, Lincoln Andrew, 22, 216 N. Canal St., Lagrange, Indiana.

Christner, Jane Ann, 34, 1931 E. 44th St., Ashtabula, Ohio; Kirk, Jason Lester, 37, 1931 E. 44th St., Ashtabula, Ohio.

Cooley, Felicia, 49, 525 Wayne St; Vactor, Kevin Lee Sr., 61, 525 Wayne St.

Crow, Jessica Lauren, 28, 2527 Poplar St.; Head, Daniel Edward, 30, 2527 Poplar St.

Donofrio, Tarra Ann, 31, 10644 W. Main Road, Lot 16, North East; Wunder, Johnny Ray Jr., 32, 10644 W. Main Road, Lot 16, North East.

Drayer, Matthew James Jr., 28, 51 E. Bond St., Corry; Esh, Annmarie Dolores, 26, 51 E. Bond St., Corry.

Ford, Brianna Ashley, 22, 4056 Garden Ave.; Stallworth, Alim Naim, 23, 4056 Garden Ave.

Geronimo, Hayley Lynne, 23, 11180 Somerset Drive, Apt 252, North Royalton, Ohio; Nerlich, Paul Edward Jr., 29, 11180 Somerset Drive, Apt 252, North Royalton, Ohio.

Gorndt, Ashley Rose, 27, 629 Kahkwa Blvd.; Pfister, Stephen Michael, 32, 629 Kahkwa Blvd.

Gourley, Meredith Ann, 32, 1803 W. 35th St.; Reininger, Mason Ginn, 32, 1803 W. 35th St.

Heinlein, Amber Lynn, 31, 10046 Railroad St., Lake City; Ruffley, David Scott, 39, 531 Huron St.

Knapp, Kayla Marie, 29, 9201 State Road, Cranesville; Daggett, Timothy Thomas, 30, 9201 State Road, Cranesville.

Kuhar, Mary Katherine, 74, 3604 Ridge Parkway; Rinke, Rudolph Thomas, 81, 135 E. 41st St.

Lotz, Patricia Ann, 56, 2135 E. 38th St.; Illig, Russell Frances, 51, 10031 Holly Drive, Lake City.

Martin, Andrew Patrick, 26, 125 W. 24th St.; Peters, Ashley Elizabeth, 26, 125 W. 24th St.

Marzka, Tanya Renee, 28, 235 Wellington Lane, Girard; Wienczkowski, Yoshu Joseph, 32, 235 Wellington Lane, Girard.

Mccloud, Tiffany Ladonna, 36, 730 E. 25th St.; Lavette, William Joseph Jr., 47, 730 E. 25th St.

Michalski, Alexa Kathleen, 29, 2633 Frontenac Drive; Meyer, Eric Albert, 26, 2633 Frontenac Drive.

Mosher, Kaitlyn Nicole, 24, 13621 W. Smith St. Ext, Corry; Reynolds, Brett Anthony, 22, 81 Elm St., Apt C, Union City.

Pacley, Davona Leeona-Charel, 30, 1416 W. 11th St.; Spraggins, Angelica Joyelle, 30, 1416 W. 11th St.

Palmer, Diane Marie, 41, 1834 W. 52nd St.; Rust, Paul Jr., 45, 1834 W. 52nd St.

Petsch, Regina Diane, 47, 40 Academy St., Albion; Perry, Ty Christian, 49, 40 Academy St., Albion.

Platz, Felicia Ann, 32, 1649 E. Grandview Blvd.; Sonntag, Todd James, 32, 1649 E. Grandview Blvd.

Senita, Vincent Michael, 32, 3422 Priscilla Drive; Lim, Lauren, 28, 3422 Priscilla Drive.

Simcoe, Kaleigh Nicole, 27, 5937 Shady Hollow Drive; Reimold, Shamus Concannon, 31, 5937 Shady Hollow Drive.

Smith, Paul Michael, 53, 2217 E. Gore Road; Freeman, Sandra Ann, 51, 3404 Christina Way Court, Perry, Ohio.

Stine, Brittany Nicole, 21, 156 Wright St., Corry; Feevey, Tyler Michael, 23, 156 Wright St., Corry.

Straight, Jesse Newton, 34, 3015 Pine Ave.; Sampson, Amanda Jean, 32, 3015 Pine Ave.

Strattan, Sarah Kay, 41, 5515 Woods Drive, Edinboro; Grazio, James Lee, 22, 5515 Woods Drive, Edinboro.

Turner, Julie Elaine, 37, 10090 Hillwood Drive, Wattsburg; Phelps, Patrick Allen, 36, 13053 Arbuckle Road, Union City.

Voss, Bonnie Linda, 41, 5381 Old State Road, McKean; Gray, George Jeffrey, 51, 5381 Old State Road, McKean.

BANKRUPTCIES

U.S. FEDERAL COURT BANKRUPTCY

Auflick, John A., 340 W. Seventh St., Apt. 9, 18-10540-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 13.

Ball, Patrick M. and Mallory J., 631 Brown Ave., 18-10558-Tpa, June 1, Chapter 7.

Bauman, Linda J., 5298 Crabapple Drive, Apt. 215, 18-10561-Tpa, June 1, Chapter 7.

Beer, Todd M., 1122 W. 21st St., 18-10538-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 7.

Dahlkemper, Laura A., 123 W. 34th St., 18-10543-Tpa May 31, Chapter 7.

Evans, David, 1542 Glenhaven Lane, 18-10525-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 13.

Ferko, Robert A. and Kathleen A., 4399 Hartwig St., North East, 18-10546-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 7.

Harman, Andrew J., 4602 W. Lake Road, 18-10536-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 7.

Howell, Jill A., 3107 Rose Ave., 18-10552-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 13.

Hughes, Melissa N., 2512 East Ave., 18-10521-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 7.

Kearney, Paul J., PO Box 9766, 18-10517-Tpa, May 28, Chapter 7.

Kobal, Eugene D. and Patricia J., 2711 Hastings Road, 18-10524-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 7.

Lyons, Jetson and Betty J., 261 E. 27th St., 18-10519-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 7.

Moore, Heather K., 2712 Greencrest Drive, 18-10518-Tpa, May 28, Chapter 7.

Owens, Jessica J., 3816 Stellar Drive, 18-10547-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 13.

Pittman, Michelle Y., 3315 Brandes St., 18-10551-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 7.

Teixeira, Christopher R., 5843 Georgetown Drive, 18-10527-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 7.

Tirpak, Christopher M. and Patti J., 113 Scots Glen Drive, Edinboro, 18-10557-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 7.

Vires, Crystal N., 430 E. Third St., 18-10528-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 7.

Williams, Tamera, 428 W. 17th St., Apt. 1 18-10522-Tpa, May 29, Chapter 7.

Wilson, Zane C., 65 E. Main St., Apt. 8, North East, 18-10549-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 7.

Wright, Matthew H. and Susan T., 9890 German Road, North East, 18-10544-Tpa, May 31, Chapter 13.

BIRTHS

MAGEE-WOMEN’S, UPMC

HAMOT

JUNE 4

Two girls to Timothy Steven and Nicole Alexandria Thompson Jones, Millcreek Township.

JUNE 5

A son to Crystal Marie Miller, Meadville.

JUNE 6

A son to Richard R. Hess and Leslie R. Fiolek-Hess, Albion.

A daughter to Leroy Eugene Learn and Kelsey Marie Shafer-Learn, North East Township.

A son to Matthew W. and Katy R. Amann, Millcreek Township.

A daughter to Kaila Mitulski-Pribonic, Erie.

A daughter to Isabello Pursell, Corry.

JUNE 7

A son to Mallorie and Sara Kaput, Millcreek Township.

A son to Alexis Monet Kestle, Erie.

A daughter to Brian and Elizabeth VanHoozer, Fairview Township.

A son to Kaylie Peebles, Girard.

JUNE 8

A son to Lakesha Nasha Vincent, Erie.

A daughter to Shauntavia Nicole Jordan, Erie.

A daughter to Ryan and Stephanie Brocious, Cambridge Springs.

A daughter to James and Santana Blackford, Waterford.

A son to Jacob and Rebekah Little, Conneautville Borough.

JUNE 9

A son to Anthony and Mara Agnello, Erie.

A son to Daniel Patrick and Emily Claire Skelton, Fairview.

statistics; +300 new citations

statistics; +300 new citations Report, nevin_manimala, linkedin, google_plus
statistics; +300 new citations Report, nevin_manimala, linkedin, google_plus

Kenis C, Decoster L, Flamaing J, Debruyne PR, De Groof I, Focan C, Cornelis F, Verschaeve V, Bachmann C, Bron D, Luce S, Debugne G, Van den Bulck H, Goeminne JC, Schrijvers D, Geboers K, Petit B, Langenaeken C, Van Rijswijk R, Specenier P, Jerusalem G, Praet JP, Vandenborre K, Lobelle JP, Lycke M, Milisen K, Wildiers H.

Ann Oncol. 2018 Jun 14. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdy210. [Epub ahead of print]

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