Twins’ Taylor Rogers has spring statistics on his mind – Star Tribune

Twins' Taylor Rogers has spring statistics on his mind - Star Tribune nevin manimala
Twins' Taylor Rogers has spring statistics on his mind - Star Tribune nevin manimala

– At the other end of the clubhouse, Jason Castro was describing how health and preparation, not statistics, were his focus this year. Across the way, Nelson Cruz was telling reporters that he doesn’t care what his spring numbers turn out to be. And at his locker, Taylor Rogers was … saying the exact opposite.

Doesn’t Rogers know that stats-don’t-matter is the default spring training position of established major leaguers everywhere?

“Oh, I know. ‘They don’t put your spring training stats on a baseball card, everyone forgets them on Opening Day,’ all that,” the Twins’ top lefthanded reliever said. “But my mind-set is, I need to have a good spring. Get some more outs, have more success. I’ve got to do better than last year.”

Facebook Vs. Twitter Vs. Snapchat: How Do Key Statistics Compare? (NASDAQ:FB)(NYSE:TWTR)(NYSE:SNAP) – Benzinga

Facebook Vs. Twitter Vs. Snapchat: How Do Key Statistics Compare? (NASDAQ:FB)(NYSE:TWTR)(NYSE:SNAP) - Benzinga nevin manimala

With the reporting season being over for social media companies, it may be time to take stock of how the major platforms performed through the lens of key metrics.

After a wave of scandals in 2018, Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB) redeemed itself credibly by reporting forecast-beating fourth-quarter results. 

Notwithstanding Twitter Inc (NYSE: TWTR)’s earnings beat, the stock came under pressure due to the company’s guidance for a spike in spending in 2019.

Snap Inc (NYSE: SNAP), which owns the ephemeral sharing platform Snapchat, also turned in encouraging Q4 results. 

Facebook Head And Shoulders Above The Rest

Daily active users, or DAUs, are a key measure of user engagement. Twitter released its DAUs for the first time, reporting monetizable DAUs of 126 million as of December 2018, representing 10-percent year-over-year growth.

Facebook’s DAUs climbed 9 percent year-over-year to 1.52 billion, while Snapchat’s edged down 0.5 percent to 186 million.

Monthly active users, or MAUs, for each of the platforms are as follows:

  • Facebook: 2.32 billion, up 9 percent year-over-year.
  • Twitter: 321 million, down 2.7 percent.

The divergence of user growth between MAUs and DAUs for Twitter is due to ongoing platform challenges, Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter said in his earnings review.

Twitter’s decline in MAU was due to product changes that limited email notifications; the impact of health initiatives; foregoing paid SMS carrier relationships in certain territories; and, to a lesser extent, GDPR in Europe, the analyst said. 

About 66 percent of Facebook’s MAUs visit the platform daily; the figure is a mere 39.2 percent for Twitter. 

Facebook Vs. Twitter Vs. Snapchat: How Do Key Statistics Compare? (NASDAQ:FB)(NYSE:TWTR)(NYSE:SNAP) - Benzinga nevin manimala

Source: Statista

Notwithstanding Facebook’s standout user statistics, the slowdown in user additions in its major market of North America is cited as a concern, as the region generates the highest average revenue per user for the company.

Snapchat Ad Revenue Grows The Fastest

Facebook’s ad revenue comprised 98.4 percent of the company’s total revenue of $16.914 billion. The platform’s revenue climbed 30 percent year-over-year.

Twitter reported ad revenue of $791 million, up 23 percent. Ad revenue accounted for 87 percent of the total, while data licensing and other revenue accounted for the rest.

For Snapchat, ad revenue represented 99 percent of the total revenue of $390 million, which grew 36 percent year-over-year.

Twitter appears to be struggling with slower user growth. Although revenue growth could decelerate and margins may compress near-term, analysts expect the platform’s investments to pay off in the long term.

Related Links:

After Blowout Q3, Twitter Earnings Ahead With Focus On User Growth

One User Statistic Facebook Needs To Be Wary About

© 2019 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Mint statistics hint at number of new collectors – Numismatic News

Mint statistics hint at number of new collectors - Numismatic News nevin manimala
Mint statistics hint at number of new collectors - Numismatic News nevin manimala

(Image courtesy www.pcgs.com)

The aftermarket for collectible coins is always difficult to access. There is no clearinghouse through which dealers report their sales. We need to rely on a series of co-incidence barometers to check the temperature of the business of coins.

The recent uptick in the trading ranges for bullion gold and silver have impacted bullion and bullion-impacted yet collectible coins in a positive way. It is still unclear if any noticeable increase in bullion-impacted coin purchases is due to an increase in the number of buyers or to the higher price each coin now commands.

Auction activity is brisk, with an increase in the total hammer price, but again the question remains – how many new buyers are getting involved? More coins are being offered through auctions than in the past. The increase in the value of the supply is important, but so is the demand side of this equation.

There may be a hint to the number of new collectors that can be seen through recent U.S. Mint collector coin statistics. The Apollo 11 commemoratives were at near sell-out prices at the time this article was being written. Proof Silver American Eagles had gained by about 6,000 pieces during the first week of February. Presidential medal sales increased, yet America the Beautiful five-quarter proof sets sales remained weak. The 5-ounce examples sold well.

We appear to be heading in a positive direction, but we still have a long way to go to reach levels seen a few years earlier.

This article was originally printed in Numismatic News. >> Subscribe today.


Mint statistics hint at number of new collectors - Numismatic News nevin manimala
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AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF – Chat Sports

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF stats are actually rather hard to find. The new Alliance of American Football has its own app, but they’ve only got scores. CBS/TNT/NFL Network broadcasts some of the games, but doesn’t have stats either. But the good news is we’re here to help! Check out the complete stats and box scores from Week 2 of the AAF! 

(This will be updated as game finish over the weekend)

Subscribe to the Chat Sports YouTube channel for more AAF coverage! 

(Note: the boxscores come from here)

Arizona Hotshots 20, Memphis Express 18

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

Subscribe to the Chat Sports YouTube channel for more AAF coverage! 

Birmingham Iron 12, Atlanta Legends 9

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

AAF Stats: Box Scores & Statistics For All Players For Week 2 Of The AAF - Chat Sports nevin manimala

Subscribe to the Chat Sports YouTube channel for more AAF coverage! 

Back to the NFL Newsfeed

Related Topics: AAF Stats, AAF 2019, AAF Box Scores, AAF

Kentucky vs. Tennessee basketball statistics summary, Feb. 16, 2019 – Lexington Herald Leader

Kentucky vs. Tennessee basketball statistics summary, Feb. 16, 2019 - Lexington Herald Leader nevin manimala
Kentucky vs. Tennessee basketball statistics summary, Feb. 16, 2019 - Lexington Herald Leader nevin manimala

The University of Kentucky took on Tennessee in a Southeastern Conference men’s basketball game in Rupp Arena. The fifth-ranked Wildcats defeated the No. 1 Volunteers 86-69.

Next up for Kentucky (21-4 overall, 10-2 SEC) is a road game at Missouri on Tuesday night.

Points: PJ Washington, 23

Rebounds: Tyler Herro, 13

Assists: Ashton Hagans, 7

Steals: Washington and Hagans, 2

Blocks: Washington and Reid Travis, 2

Turnovers: Travis, Keldon Johnson and Immanuel Quickley, 2

Click here to view a complete statistics report from the game.

LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER SPORTS PASS

The Herald-Leader is now offering a digital sports-only one-year subscription for $30. You’ll get unlimited access to all Herald-Leader sports stories.

Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy – Penn State News

Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy - Penn State News nevin manimala
Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy - Penn State News nevin manimala

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a Penn State statistician.

“My key interest is in developing methodology that would enable broader sharing of confidential data in a way that can aid in scientific discovery,” said Aleksandra Slavkovic, professor of statistics and associate dean for graduate education, Eberly College of Science, Penn State. “Being able to share confidential data with minimal quantifiable risk for discovery of sensitive information and still ensure statistical accuracy and integrity, is the goal.”

Slavkovic has found solutions to this data privacy problem through interdisciplinary collaborations, especially with computer and social scientists. Her research focuses on various data, including network data that capture relationship information between entities such as individuals or institutions. She reported her approaches to providing synthetic networks that satisfy a notion of differential privacy today (Feb 16) during the 2019 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.

Differential privacy provides a mathematically provable guarantee of the level of privacy loss to individuals.

Scientists want access to data collected by others for their research, but such access could also compromise personal privacy, even after removal of so-called personally identifiable data.

“An abundance of auxiliary data is the main culprit,” said Slavkovic. “With methodological and technological advances in data collection and record linkage, easier access to variety of data sources that could be linked with a dataset in hand, and funding agencies requirements to share data, the risks to data privacy are increasing. But, finding good solutions for managing privacy loss are essential for enabling sound scientific discovery.”

 Publicly available information from a drug trial on an HIV drug, for example, would indicate who was in the treatment group and who was in the control group. The treatment group would contain only people diagnosed with HIV and even though the data owners withheld personal particulars from that data set, some identifying information would remain. Because so much information is today available online in social media and in other datasets, it is possible to connect the dots and identify people, potentially revealing their HIV status.

“Techniques to link two data sets, say voter records and health insurance data, have greatly improved,” said Slavkovic. “In one of the earliest findings, Latanya Sweeny (now at Harvard) showed that by linking these type of data, you can identify 87 percent of the people in the U.S. Census from 1990 based on their date of birth, gender and 5-digit zip code. More recently, researchers used tweets and associated Twitter metadata to show that they can identify users with 96.7 percent accuracy.”

Slavkovic notes that it is not just people or institutions whose data are contained in the databases, but that people outside the database can also suffer from invasion of privacy, directly or by association. Linkages between information in a dataset and information on social media might lead to a serious privacy breech — something like HIV status or sexual orientation could have severe repercussions if revealed.

While privacy is important, collected datasets make up an essential source of information for researchers. Currently, in some cases when the data are exceptionally sensitive, researchers must physically go to the data repositories to do their research, making research more difficult and expensive.

Slavkovic is interested in network data. Information that shows the interconnectedness of people or institutions — the nodes — and the connections between nodes. Her approach is to create slightly altered, mirrored network datasets with a few of the nodes moved, connections shifted or edges altered.

“The aim is to create new networks that satisfy the rigorous differential privacy requirements and at the same time capture most of the statistical features from the original network,” said Slavkovic.

These synthetic datasets might be sufficient for some researchers to satisfy their research needs. For others, it would be sufficient to test their approaches and hypothesis before having to go to the data storage site. Researchers could test code, do exploratory research and perhaps basic analysis while waiting for permission to use the original data in its repository site.

“We can’t satisfy demands for all statistical analysis with the same type of altered data,” said Slavkovic. “Some people will need the original data, but others might go a long way with synthetic data such as synthetic networks.”

National emergency declaration: Trump claims he’s privy to secret stats – Vox.com

National emergency declaration: Trump claims he’s privy to secret stats - Vox.com nevin manimala

Undocumented immigrants commit crimes at lower rates than native-born Americans. The vast majority of drugs smuggled into the country through the southern border come through ports of entry. The construction of a border wall in El Paso did not reduce violent crime.

But all those facts — which come from federal government crime statistics — cut against the narrative that President Donald Trump is pushing. So during the South Lawn event on Friday in which he announced he’ll sign a national emergency declaration pertaining to the southern border, Trump simply denied them.

Instead of backing his claims with numbers, Trump sensationalized individual instances of immigrant crime, resorted to suggesting he’s privy to secret statistics, and made an evidence-free case that a wall is needed to stop human traffickers from taking “three women with tape on their mouth or three women whose hands are tied” across the border in remote areas between ports of entry.

Trump gaslights about the impact a wall would have on stopping the inflow of drugs

First, Trump denied the Drug Enforcement Agency’s finding that smuggled drugs largely come through the southern border, citing the response he received at a political rally earlier this week in El Paso, Texas, when he asked his audience about the impact a border wall had there.

“You listen to politicians, in particular certain Democrats, they say [drugs] all come through the ports of entry. It’s wrong, it’s wrong. It’s just a lie. It’s all a lie,” Trump said.

“The other night I was in El Paso, we had a tremendous crowd, and I asked the people — many of whom were from El Paso, but they came from all over Texas — and I asked them, I said, ‘Let me ask you as a crowd, when the wall went up, was it better?’ … It was not only better, it was, like, 100 percent better.”

But as is the case in most other American cities, violent crime in El Paso has been falling steadily for about 25 years, and actually went up slightly after border fencing was installed there in 2008 and 2009.

CNN recently depicted this in a graph:

National emergency declaration: Trump claims he’s privy to secret stats - Vox.com nevin manimala CNN

And despite what Trump would have you believe, these numbers come from the FBI — not Democrats.

Trump called immigrant crime statistics “fake news”

Later, CNN’s Jim Acosta asked Trump what he thinks about a number of studies rooted in crime statistics compiled by the federal government that indicate immigrants — both documented and undocumented — commit crimes at lower rates than native-born Americans.

Trump flatly denied that the studies are accurate, and instead pointed at “Angel Moms” — mothers of children murdered by undocumented immigrants — who were in attendance.

“You don’t believe that stat, do you? Do you really believe that stat?” Trump said, suggesting Acosta is gullible. “Ask the Angel Moms. What do you think? Am I creating something? … Your question is a very political question. You’re CNN, you’re fake news, you have an agenda … the numbers you gave are wrong.”

But Trump’s suggestion that undocumented immigrants are more prone to committing acts of violence is false. For instance, a 2018 Cato Institute study that looked at crime in Texas found, “As a percentage of their respective populations, there were 56 percent fewer criminal convictions of illegal immigrants than of native-born Americans in Texas in 2015.”

“The criminal conviction rate for legal immigrants was about 85 percent below the native-born rate,” it adds.

In an overview of the relevant social science research published last year, the Washington Post concluded, “Undocumented immigrants are considerably less likely to commit crime than native-born citizens, with immigrants legally in the United States even less likely to do so.”

Trump claims he has access to secret statistics

Playboy’s Brian Karem pressed Trump about data from Customs and Border Protection (CBP) showing the number of being arrested trying to cross the southern border has steadily declined over the past 20 years, to 396,579 last year from 1,643,679 in 2000 — numbers cutting against Trump’s case that the situation at the southern border is an emergency.

Trump quickly got angry with Karem, telling him to “sit down.” He then suggested his position is based on statistics that aren’t publicly available.

“You have stats that are far worse than the ones I use,” Trump told Karem.

Trump’s willingness to flat-out deny reality when it doesn’t suit his purposes highlights one of the dangers of his presidency: He is shameless about not just contradicting the findings of his own government agencies but constructing a fact-free alternate reality where immigrants are violent criminals, drugs and tied-up women are pouring across the southern border, and the number of people making a dangerous trek through remote regions to enter the United States presents an existential threat.

But in a moment of accidental candor, Trump admitted his emergency declaration is unnecessary.

“I want to do it faster. I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn’t need to do this, but I’d rather do it much faster,” Trump said.

That admission could come back to haunt him when his emergency declaration is challenged in court. Trump acknowledged that such a challenge is likely during Friday’s event but expressed confidence that the Supreme Court will ultimately rule in his favor.


The news moves fast. To stay updated, follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter, and read more of Vox’s policy and politics coverage.

Our Views: On race, statistics don’t tell the full story – Gazettextra

Our Views: On race, statistics don't tell the full story - Gazettextra nevin manimala
Our Views: On race, statistics don't tell the full story - Gazettextra nevin manimala

Statistics showing a racial disparity in Rock County arrest rates confirm what most of us instinctively knew to be true. Law enforcement agencies across the U.S. have been grappling with this issue for years.

The statistics, provided by the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council and highlighted in a Sunday story by Gazette reporter Frank Schultz, don’t inform the community, unfortunately, on what to do next. We’d like to see the council dig deeper, starting with a breakdown of the data by jurisdiction to determine whether racial disparities are better or worse in certain areas.

Taken on their face and without any context, the statistics (black adults are arrested in Rock County at a rate of 419 per 1,000 adults versus white adults at 59 per 1,000) might seem alarming.

But the numbers don’t control for other factors, such as education levels and income. Indeed, we’ve heard few stories of overt racism practiced by local law enforcement, at least in Janesville. If these arrests are racially motivated, there hasn’t been an outcry, including from the African-American community.

Police Chief David Moore has been a Rock County leader in improving race relations. When asked about the disparities, Moore cautioned against blaming racism, in so far as his department’s conduct is concerned.

Reducing racial disparities is a noble goal, whether for arrests, education, employment and every other walk of life. But law enforcement’s mission is to keep the public safe, not to change statistics. We need officers to go where the law requires—to where crimes are reported. They shouldn’t second-guess their actions based on the incomplete picture created by these statistics.

We doubt Janesville officers engage in racial profiling, but if they do, they certainly haven’t received approval from Moore. He makes a point to reach out to the minority community, including through the formation of the African American Liaison Advisory Committee. Moore’s efforts to train officers in “implicit bias,” making officers aware of prejudices they might not realize they have, are laudable.

We should note, too, Moore received this year’s YWCA Racial Justice Award from the YWCA Rock County, recognizing the chief for his work in reducing tensions between minorities and police.

Lonnie Brigham Jr., who is chairman of the African American Liaison Advisory Committee, has expressed concern about the disparities, but he also recognizes Moore’s efforts.

“Chief Moore has shown an unwavering commitment to social and racial justice here in Janesville,” wrote Brigham in a letter supporting Moore’s nomination for the YWCA award.

But Brigham’s experience in Janesville has not been perfect. He told the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council he felt prejudice after moving from Chicago to Janesville 19 years ago, including being followed while shopping and being stopped repeatedly at 3 a.m. on his way to catch a train to Chicago, until police became familiar with him.

We as a society should do more to reduce racism and the disparities revealed in these statistics. But we also need to be careful about giving too much credence and putting too much faith in statistics. They rarely tell the full story.