A new Canalys Report bends the Statistics to take Apple out of the Smartphone Race in Southeast Asia – Patently Apple

A new Canalys Report bends the Statistics to take Apple out of the Smartphone Race in Southeast Asia - Patently Apple nevin manimala

Earlier today Canalys posted a report titled “Chinese Smartphone Brands take 62% of Southeast Asia’s 30.7 million shipments.” While there’s no doubt that Chinese smartphone vendors (Oppo, Vivo, Xiaomi and Huawei) collectively own Southeast Asian market that includes Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia, the purposeful exclusion of Apple taints Canalys report.

A new Canalys Report bends the Statistics to take Apple out of the Smartphone Race in Southeast Asia - Patently Apple nevin manimala(Click on image to slightly Enlarge)

If the 2019 Statista report is correct, then Apple has been the mobile leader in Vietnam from 2013 to 2019 as presented in the chart below. In contrast Canalys claims that Samsung led Vietnam with 36%, Oppo with 26% and Xiaomi with 9%. The statista report has Apple in and around 38% for 2019 and Samsung at around 28%.  

A new Canalys Report bends the Statistics to take Apple out of the Smartphone Race in Southeast Asia - Patently Apple nevin manimala(Click on image to enlarge substantially)

In another report, analysis by “Statcounter” for Mobile Vendor Market Share in the Philippines has Samsung at 30%, Apple at 17.76%, Oppo at 14.39% and Huawei at 10.2%. According to the statistics from Canalys, Apple didn’t make the top three in the Philippines.

Clearly the statistics from Statista and Statcounter show that the Canalys report may have another agenda as they dramatically clash in at least two of the markets listed.

The big threat for the Chinese vendors, according to Canalys, is Samsung with their all-new Galaxy A series of smartphones. On Monday Patently Apple posted a report titled “Samsung Dominated the Smartphone Market in Europe in Q2 due to their new Mid-Tier A-Models while iPhone shipments Dropped.” Three of the top five smartphones sold in Europe in Q2 went to Galaxy A series models (the A50, A40 and A20e) that delivered excellent specifications at mid-level pricing. Apple’s iPhone XR is the only smartphone that made the top 5 in Europe. Samsung’s success is pushing them back to leadership in Southeast Asia.

While the Canalys report lists Vivo, Oppo and Realme as different Chinese competitors, in reality the three smartphone companies are owned by BBK Electronics. In fact they also own OnePlus, a fourth successful brand that is now in the U.S. market.

Each brand covers a particular price point in the market. By having multiple brands, it pushes Apple down in a top five chart. If all of the brands were simply under BBK Electronic, Apple would be third in the market behind BBK and Huawei. It’s kind of a psychological game the Chinese are playing to win over the Chinese consumer and it’s working.   

There’s no doubt that between the multiple brands from China and Samsung’s new Galaxy A series, Apple will be under tremendous stress to stay in the top five list in China, Southeast Asia and beyond in the coming year – but that’s a story for another day.

For now, the Canalys report published today about Apple being a non-player in Southeast Asia has been proven to be false in at least Vietnam and the Philippines. Is it fake news? You be the judge. Send in your comments below.

A new Canalys Report bends the Statistics to take Apple out of the Smartphone Race in Southeast Asia - Patently Apple nevin manimala

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How Immigration Prosecutions Helped ICE Pad Obama’s Criminal Deportee Statistics – HuffPost

How Immigration Prosecutions Helped ICE Pad Obama's Criminal Deportee Statistics - HuffPost nevin manimala

Throughout Barack Obama’s presidency, he justified the record number of deportations carried out by Immigration and Customs Enforcement by pointing to the high number of criminals deported. 

“We’re going to keep focusing enforcement resources on actual threats to our security,” Obama said in a 2014 speech announcing executive action to shield parents of U.S. citizens from deportation. “Felons, not families. Criminals, not children. Gang members, not a mom who’s working hard to provide for her kids.” 

By Obama’s last year in office, publicly released data showed that 58% of deportees had a criminal conviction. More than 99% of deportees met one of the agency’s removal priorities.  

But data obtained this month by HuffPost through a Freedom of Information Act request reveals the most serious crime committed by more than half of the migrants arrested at the border and tagged as criminal deportees during Obama’s second term was entering the country without authorization.

In other words, the difference between those slapped with a criminal immigration offense and those with a clean record was that the Justice Department chose to prosecute them simply for crossing the border. Immigration violations were the most serious crimes committed by tens of thousands of others deported from within the United States and classified as priority removals over that period, despite the fact that their records differed little from non-criminals. Some 2020 Democratic candidates, including Julián Castro and Elizabeth Warren, are pledging to repeal the laws that make this possible. 

The data underscores the degree to which skyrocketing prosecutions for border-crossing violations over the last decade helped criminalize a vast swath of the deportee population, giving the impression that they posed a greater public security threat than their records indicate. 

“They’ve been turning mere immigration law violators into criminal aliens for years in order to inflate the amount of individuals that have been removed under criminal grounds,” immigration attorney Matthew Kolken told HuffPost. “These were freshly minted criminals. They weren’t committing crimes in the United States.” 

While convicts made up nearly half of those deported from the border region from 2013 to 2016, the data makes it clear that there weren’t hordes of violent criminals. Traffic violations accounted for the second-highest number of criminal convictions for border deportees, making up 11% to 14% for those years. 

The data provided by ICE included only broad categories of crime, but previous reporting indicates that driving while intoxicated and driving without a license make up the vast majority of traffic violations on deportees’ records. Only 15% of border deportees under Obama’s second term had a conviction more serious than an immigration or traffic offense. 

A much smaller percentage committed more serious crimes. Far less than 1% of criminal migrants from the border and interior combined were convicted of a crime involving homicide, for example. Agency statistics include some deaths resulting from negligence or car crashes under that heading. 

“I’m seeing padding of the number of the people they consider to be criminals with a lot of low-level traffic violations and immigration violations,” said Douglas Massey, a Princeton sociology professor and co-founder of the Mexico Migration Project, after reviewing the data. “The criminal categories are vastly inflated. The violent crimes are really small in number.”

Under Obama, ICE produced end-of-year reports that highlighted the number of criminals the agency deported, trumpeting the high percentage of convicted criminals. Those reports divided deportees removed from the interior from those expelled from the border region largely because the agency considered those arrested while trying to cross into the country a deportation priority regardless of whether they had criminal records. 

But the agency did not release detailed statistics over the Obama presidency detailing what convictions had marred individual migrants’ records. Instead, ICE used a system of priority categories for those deported from the interior and recorded only whether border deportees had a criminal conviction or not. 

The sharp rise in prosecutions for border violations that began under George W. Bush’s presidency explains the statistical sleight of hand. 

In the United States, deportation is handled under civil laws by immigration authorities such as the Border Patrol and ICE. But crossing the border without authorization is also a federal crime, punishable by up to six months in prison. Re-offenders can face felony charges. 

The law criminalizing illegal entry, authored in 1929 by segregationist Sen. Coleman Blease of South Carolina and now known as Section 1325, made up a tiny fraction of federal prosecutions by the 1990s. Instead, Border Patrol agents routinely walked unauthorized migrants back to the other side of the border or referred them for deportation proceedings in immigration court. 

But starting in 2005, the departments of Justice and Homeland Security teamed up to create Operation Streamline, a program to prosecute migrants en masse for jumping the border, in an effort to route Central American migrants into federal jails and create a new deterrent. By 2008, immigration prosecutions had swallowed up half the federal criminal docket ― a statistical trend that held true through Obama’s presidency.

President Donald Trump ramped up the system further by enacting a “zero tolerance” policy, mandating all five federal districts that touch the border to focus still more resources on immigration prosecutions. Last year, Trump used the laws criminalizing illegal entry and reentry to carry out his widely reviled experiment with systematic family separations at the border last year. By prosecuting migrant parents traveling with their children, Trump officials channeled them into federal jails, leaving their children in the custody of immigration agencies.

Immigrant rights groups and criminal justice reformers have long argued that the laws needlessly criminalize migrants, drive the expansion of privatized prisons and slap a redundant punishment on people who will have to face deportation proceedings regardless of whether they get prosecuted for illegal entry.

But advocates have also long suspected that the skyrocketing illegal entry prosecutions helped both the Obama and Trump administrations pad their stats to make the deportee population appear like more of a threat than it actually is. 

How Immigration Prosecutions Helped ICE Pad Obama's Criminal Deportee Statistics - HuffPost nevin manimala

President Barack Obama speaks at the White House about a Supreme Court decision on immigration on June 23, 2016.

“They’re creating this illusion that so many people removed have criminal histories, but they’re manufacturing this criminal history by prosecuting them for illegal entry and illegal reentry,” said Zenén Jaimes Pérez, advocacy and communications director for the Texas Civil Rights Project. “We know that picture starts to fall apart once you start digging into it.” 

The broad criminal categories identified in the documents released by ICE make it difficult to know with any certainty what convictions had led the agency to classify deportees expelled from inside the country as criminals. It identifies only broad headings like “dangerous drugs,” “homicide” and “traffic tickets.” Those categories encompass crimes ranging from marijuana possession and driving without a license to drunk driving, drug trafficking and capital murder. 

But there’s no doubt about what the “immigration” heading means. Over those four years, illegal entry and reentry accounted for 95% of the most serious criminal convictions for deportees under the “immigration” heading from 2013 to 2016, according to data previously released to HuffPost. The stats did not distinguish between interior and border removals. 

The most serious criminal conviction for 21,000 of the migrants deported from within the United States during Obama’s second term was an immigration violation ― about 6.5% of all interior removals. Those convicted of illegal reentry, a felony, would have been classified as a level one priority throughout the period ― the same categorization applied to terrorists and murderers. 

Thousands of other deportees removed from inside the country during that period had no criminal convictions at all ― ranging from 17.5% in 2013 to 7.6% in Obama’s last year. 

The number of interior deportees whose most serious offense was an immigration crime dwindled over time. That trend mirrored a drop in deportations from within the country as a whole over Obama’s second term in office as his administration used both prosecutorial discretion and executive action to shield more migrants from deportation. The trend accelerated after the collapse of comprehensive immigration reform talks in the summer of 2014. 

Former ICE officials defended the agency’s statistical work, contending that they did not intend to mislead the public. They pointed to the series of memos beginning in 2011 that aimed at prioritizing serious criminals, which account for the steady decrease in deportations from inside the country overall. And they insisted that Obama’s policy of focusing on criminal convicts made more efficient use of limited deportation resources than Trump’s policy of casting priorities aside. 

They’ve been turning mere immigration law violators into criminal aliens for years in order to inflate the amount of individuals that have been removed under criminal grounds. Immigration attorney Matthew Kolken

But the former officials also noted that pushing those priorities down the chain of command took time. And the administration’s focus on deporting people who had been removed in the past meant that people with immigration crimes would show up in agency deportation stats. 

“We never felt that the number of criminal removals was padded,” said Peter Vincent, who headed ICE’s legal branch during the Obama administration. “We were particularly sensitive to any skewing of any statistics that would suggest or imply that the number of criminal removals were higher than in actuality.”

The agency struggled with certain crimes that fell into a gray area, like driving under the influence. That traffic offense often remained a priority offense because it could result in death, though prosecutors might use discretion in some cases. 

But though Vincent remains a vocal supporter of Obama’s prosecutorial discretion policies, he acknowledged that the word “criminal” implied something more serious than immigration violations ― often the same ones committed by deportees with clean criminal records.  

“We did target recent illegal entrants as a way to dissuade individuals from attempting to cross the border,” Vincent said. “That is different from simply categorizing everyone who crosses the border without authorization as a criminal. ‘Criminal’ has a different meaning and should be used to refer to someone who is a danger to our community or who has been convicted of a serious offense.”

John Sandweg, who headed ICE as an acting director under Obama, defended the use of criminal prosecutions at the border, saying that internal reports showed it worked as a more effective deterrent than civil deportation proceedings. But both in the interior of the country and along the border, the agency prioritized deporting people who had been expelled before, whether or not they had been convicted of a crime. The fact that so many people deported from the border had criminal convictions in the United States, whether they were serious or not, showed how many had spent time here in the past. 

“The fact that they had been previously convicted for Streamline is interesting ― it’s a fair data point to be thinking of,” Sandweg said. “But the fact is that they were not deported because they were convicted of a silly 1325. It’s because they were arrested at the border.” 

Others viewed a clear continuity between the way ICE categorized criminals in agency statistics under Obama and the way Trump vilifies unauthorized migrants by branding them as menacing lawbreakers. 

Kolken, the immigration lawyer, routinely defends migrants facing prosecution for illegal reentry and the prospect of deportation at his practice in Buffalo, New York, about 1,800 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border.

To secure a conviction, all the prosecutor needs to do is present evidence that the defendant was deported in the past. In those cases, immigration authorities often reinstate an old order of removal while the criminal immigration charge plays out, Kolken said. Were it not for the illegal reentry charge, he would have an opportunity to try to cancel the old order and win his client a hearing. But when the old removal order gets reinstated, his client loses the opportunity to go before an immigration judge. The vast majority of his clients have no convictions on their records aside from the illegal reentry. The scenario has played out repeatedly over the years, regardless of administration. 

“There is very little difference between Trump calling these people ‘bad hombres’ and Obama calling these people ‘felons, not families,’” Kolken said. “Both were attempting to dehumanize this population. Obama was allowed to get away with it. Thankfully, Trump can’t.”

Local crime statistics show improvement – The Hutchinson News

Local crime statistics show improvement - The Hutchinson News nevin manimala
Local crime statistics show improvement - The Hutchinson News nevin manimala

Crime is down, but not out in Hutchinson and Reno County so far in 2019, according to data from Hutchinson Police Chief Jeff Hooper.

Last year, this area bucked a statewide trend of growing crimes rates. But totals, however, show the city and county overall continue to have an issue with property crimes, with higher rates of burglary, theft and motor vehicle theft than peer communities.

Hooper credited the 2019 drops to a few initiatives since he took the helm in October 2018, including increased community engagement by assigning officers to regular beats and the K-9 and repeat offenders units.

The K-9 unit, which started in January, contributed to 92 drug arrests through June, while the repeat offender unit clocked in 97 arrests, Hooper said.

“I don’t like to play defense, and that’s what this agency used to do,” Hooper said. “A crime would happen and we would go and make a report … We weren’t being proactive in (fighting crime).”

Kansas trends

The Kansas Bureau of Investigation tracks crime throughout the state through reports submitted by individual law enforcement agencies.

The statistics come with the caveats, however, in that not all agencies report, not all report for a full calendar year and some report differently.

The statistics for 2018, released a couple of weeks ago, indicated that violent crime in Kansas continues to trend upward.

In 2018, law enforcement across the state recorded 12,367 violent crimes, which represents an overall increase of 5.3% in the categories of murder, rape, robbery and aggravated assault or aggravated battery.

The statewide violent crime rate of 4.2 crimes per 1,000 people is currently 16.5% above the 10-year average.

Contributing to the overall increase was a nearly 11% increase in reported rapes and a 7.8% increase in aggravated assaults, compared to 2017.

The number of murders and robberies statewide, however, both declined.

Hutchinson

Hutchinson marked its lowest overall level of crime since at least 2013, with a drop in every category of Class 1 crime except rape, which matched 2017.

Overall, total felony-level crimes in the city for 2018 was down more than 14% from the prior year and down more than 9% over the five-year average.

The data shows Hutchinson ranks 11th among all cities in the state with a police department by its total population, with 40,573 residents.

The city, however, came in eighth among more than 200 reporting municipal police departments for its rate of crime per 1,000 residents, or per capita crime.

The city recorded 46.7 crimes per 1,000 residents in 2018. That compared to a rate of 53.7 in 2017 and a 5-year average of 51.

The statewide per capita crime rate was just 27.2 last year.

HPD Chief Jeff Hooper said through the first half of 2019, the department has recorded a crime rate of just 31.6 crimes per 1,000 residents, and at the current trend, would end the year at 32.8.

That’s a roughly 31% drop in overall crime, with property crimes down 33% compared to the first half of 2018, Hooper said.

If the decline holds for the year, it would also drop Hutchinson down to 28th on the police department list.

City comparisons

Hutchinson’s overall 1,895 felony crime reports for 2018 ranked it seventh overall for cities with a police department in terms of the total number of crimes reported, behind Wichita, Kansas City, Topeka, Overland Park, Lawrence and Olathe.

Independence tops the per capita crime list, with an average of 71 crimes per 1,000 people. Wichita, Kansas City and Topeka were also in the top 10, joined by Coffeyville, Pittsburg and Arkansas City.

In 2018, Hutchinson recorded one homicide, 26 rapes, 18 robberies and 118 assaults.

That was one less homicide, 21 fewer robberies and 56 fewer assaults than the previous year, or a nearly 54% drop in robberies and a 32% drop in assaults, year-over-year.

For violent crime, Hutchinson ranked 11th among police departments in total crimes, though it falls to 19th when viewed by per capita, with four violent crimes per 1,000 people.

Topping the violent crime list per capita is Wichita, with 11.8, followed by Leavenworth, Parsons, Great Bend, Independence and then Newton.

Hutchison ranked 10th in the state for the total number of rapes and robberies, but it was 21st among cities for its per capita rate of sexual assaults and 24th for robberies. It fell to 34th for per capita batteries or assaults.

Property crimes

The city also recorded healthy declines in property crime, with an overall drop of 12%, including a nearly 18%% plunge in burglaries.

The data showed 354 burglaries in Hutchinson last year, compared to 431 in 2017 and an average since 2013 of 381.

The city, however, remains in sixth place in the state for total burglaries, behind Wichita, Topeka, Kansas City and Lawrence.

All those cities, except Hutchinson, drop off the top 10 list cities when looking at per-capita burglaries. There Hutchinson ranks ninth.

Independence again tops the list, with all the other towns in the group having populations under 10,000 people.

Hutchinson’s felony theft rate also dipped, with 1,255 thefts reported in the city in 2018, down from nearly 1,400, though that’s still an average of more than three per day.

For data from the past five years, the city’s theft rate peaked in 2015, the FBI reports indicate, at 1,452 or just under four thefts per day.

Countywide totals

Like Hutchinson, the county overall experienced drops in every category of crime except rapes — which went up by one. The change was in the number of sexual assaults investigated by the Reno County Sheriff’s Office, which went from three to four.

The sheriff’s department also saw one other crime category grow, motor vehicle thefts, reaching its highest mark in at least five years.

The number of vehicle thefts investigated by that agency shot up from 27 to 37, a 27% increase.

Overall countywide, however, vehicle thefts were down about a dozen.

The county witnessed a 30% drop in violent crime including a nearly 54% drop in robberies and a 30% drop in assaults.

Countywide, there were also 100 fewer burglaries, an almost 19% decline, and 169 fewer thefts, for a 10.5% change.

County comparisons

Exploring the county’s rankings among the state’s 105 counties, it scores comparatively well for violent crimes.

The county, however, is way up there for most categories of property crime.

Reno County, which ranks ninth in total population, was sixth in total property crimes, seventh in per capita property crime rate and sixth in total burglaries.

The 438 vehicle or home break-ins reported countywide last year pushed the county to fifth in the state for its per capita burglary rate.

Ranking higher were only Montgomery, Kearny, Thomas and Sedgwick counties.

Montgomery County had almost nine burglaries per 1,000 residents, compared to Reno’s seven, while the state average is just 4.25. Reno tied with Barton County.

The county also ranked 6th in motor vehicle thefts, with 164, or almost one every other day, and sixth in per capita motor vehicle theft.

Sheriff’s reports

Crime data for the Reno County Sheriff’s Office showed that agency, ranked sixth in the state for its population served the by the office, was also sixth for total crime.

It ranked fifth among SO’s for total rape reports, theft reports and motor vehicle thefts, while ranking sixth for total burglaries and arsons.

In per capita comparisons, however, Reno County was way down the list.

It ranked 49th in per capita violent crime, 28th in rapes, and 44th for assault and battery.

For property crimes, it was 21st in total per capita, 31st for burglaries and 29th for theft.

Its highest ranking was for motor vehicle thefts, where it came in 12th per capita.

Other local towns

Law enforcement in three other municipalities within Reno County also reported crimes statistics for 2018, though none of them had a full year’s reporting.

The South Hutchinson Police Department, which saw much turmoil in the past year with cuts to the department and a couple of changes in administration, reported data for just seven months.

The city experienced a drop in most categories of felony crime reported, ranging from 12% to 50%. The exceptions were one more battery in 2018 than 2017, with three, and a big jump in burglaries, going from nine to 13.

In all, South Hutchinson reported 53 felony crimes, including 36 thefts, one auto theft, and two arsons. That compared to 61 crimes in 2017, with 43 thefts, seven stolen vehicles and three cases of arson.

The city of Haven, which was without a police chief for a few months, reported statistics for nine months.

That city had even more dramatic drops than South Hutchinson, with only eight felony-level crimes reported for the year, compared to 26 in 2017.

Haven reported no violent crimes, compared to five in 2017, and eight property crimes, compared to 21 the prior year. There were only half as many burglaries, and thefts went from 16 to four. The only category that showed an increase was vehicle theft, which went from one to two.

Buhler police also reported for only seven months of statistics, though that historically has been the department’s practice.

It also saw dramatic drops, going from 13 Class 1 crimes in 2017 to just four last year. The four, however, included a rape, the first there in several years. There were also two thefts — down from nine in 2017 — and one motor vehicle theft.

Find the full Kansas Crime Index Report at http://www.accesskansas.org/kbi/news/72519.shtml.

statistics; +941 new citations

statistics; +941 new citations Report, nevin manimala
statistics; +941 new citations Report, nevin manimala

Din L, Sheikh M, Kosaraju N, Smedby KE, Bernatsky S, Berndt SI, Skibola CF, Nieters A, Wang S, McKay JD, Cocco P, Maynadié M, Foretová L, Staines A, Mack TM, de Sanjosé S, Vyse TJ, Padyukov L, Monnereau A, Arslan AA, Moore A, Brooks-Wilson AR, Novak AJ, Glimelius B, Birmann BM, Link BK, Stewart C, Vajdic CM, Haioun C, Magnani C, Conti DV, Cox DG, Casabonne D, Albanes D, Kane E, Roman E, Muzi G, Salles G, Giles GG, Adami HO, Ghesquières H, De Vivo I, Clavel J, Cerhan JR, Spinelli JJ, Hofmann J, Vijai J, Curtin K, Costenbader KH, Onel K, Offit K, Teras LR, Morton L, Conde L, Miligi L, Melbye M, Ennas MG, Liebow M, Purdue MP, Glenn M, Southey MC, Din M, Rothman N, Camp NJ, Wong Doo N, Becker N, Pradhan N, Bracci PM, Boffetta P, Vineis P, Brennan P, Kraft P, Lan Q, Severson RK, Vermeulen RCH, Milne RL, Kaaks R, Travis RC, Weinstein SJ, Chanock SJ, Ansell SM, Slager SL, Zheng T, Zhang Y, Benavente Y, Taub Z, Madireddy L, Gourraud PA, Oksenberg JR, Cozen W, Hjalgrim H, Khankhanian P.

Genet Epidemiol. 2019 Aug 13. doi: 10.1002/gepi.22242. [Epub ahead of print]

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5 Statistics that Prove Why Music Education is so Important – 98.5 The Sports Hub

5 Statistics that Prove Why Music Education is so Important - 98.5 The Sports Hub nevin manimala
5 Statistics that Prove Why Music Education is so Important - 98.5 The Sports Hub nevin manimala
wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock

When a school district is faced with a budget issue, music programs are often among the first cut. It’s a problem that districts around the country have faced for years now despite several studies that show the benefits of music education.

Here are five statistics that prove why music education is so important

1. Better Test Scores

Nature Neuroscience found that students participating in music education programs score higher on standardized tests than students who do not.

2. Higher Graduation Rates

According to Children’s Music Workshop, schools with music programs averaged a 90.2% graduation rate, while schools without music education had an average graduation rate of 72.9%.

3. Fewer Discipline Issues

A study from the Northeast Iowa School of Music found that children involved with music programs have shown to have fewer discipline issues and get along better with classmates.

4. Greater Cognitive Benefits

There are numerous cognitive benefits when children participate in music education programs including having greater abstract reasoning, better listening skills and improved memory.

5. Improved Ability to Accept Constructive Criticism

A study published by The Wall Street Journal found that children involved in music education programs “offer a space where kids learn how to accept and give constructive criticism.” Another study from the Neighborhood Music School in New Haven, Conn. concurred and found that “Turning negative feedback into positive change helps build self-confidence.”

Chemometric tools for the authentication of cod liver oil based on nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy data.

Chemometric tools for the authentication of cod liver oil based on nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy data. nevin manimala, Anal Bioanal Chem
Chemometric tools for the authentication of cod liver oil based on nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy data. nevin manimala, Anal Bioanal Chem

Cod liver oil is a popular dietary supplement marketed as a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids as well as vitamins A and D. Due to its high market price, cod liver oil is vulnerable to adulteration with lower priced vegetable oils. In this study, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and gas chromatography (coupled to a flame ionization detector) were used in combination with multivariate statistics to determine cod liver oil adulteration with common vegetable oils (sunflower and canola oils). Artificial neural networks (ANN) were able to differentiate adulteration levels based on infrared spectra with a detection limit of 0.22% and a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.86%. ANN models using 1H NMR and 13C NMR data yielded detection limits of 3.0% and 1.8% and RMSEPs of 2.7% and 1.1%, respectively. In comparison, the ANN model based on fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatography achieved a detection limit of 0.81% and an RMSEP of 1.1%. The approach of using spectroscopic techniques in combination with multivariate statistics can be regarded as a promising tool for the authentication of cod liver oil and may pave the way for a holistic quality assessment of fish oils. Graphical abstract.

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Source and background threshold values of potentially toxic elements in soils by multivariate statistics and GIS-based mapping: a high density sampling survey in the Parauapebas basin, Brazilian Amazon.

Source and background threshold values of potentially toxic elements in soils by multivariate statistics and GIS-based mapping: a high density sampling survey in the Parauapebas basin, Brazilian Amazon. nevin manimala, Environ Geochem Health
Source and background threshold values of potentially toxic elements in soils by multivariate statistics and GIS-based mapping: a high density sampling survey in the Parauapebas basin, Brazilian Amazon. nevin manimala, Environ Geochem Health

A high-density regional-scale soil geochemical survey comprising 727 samples (one sample per each 5 × 5 km grid) was carried out in the Parauapebas sub-basin of the Brazilian Amazonia, under the Itacaiúnas Basin Geochemical Mapping and Background Project. Samples were taken from two depths at each site: surface soil, 0-20 cm and deep soil, 30-50 cm. The ground and sieved (< 75 µm) fraction was digested using aqua regia and analyzed for 51 elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). All data were used here, but the principal focus was on the potential toxic elements (PTEs) and Fe and Mn to evaluate the spatial distribution patterns and to establish their geochemical background concentrations in soils. Geochemical maps as well as principal component analysis (PCA) show that the distribution patterns of the elements are very similar between surface and deep soils. The PCA, applied on clr-transformed data, identified four major associations: Fe-Ti-V-Sc-Cu-Cr-Ni (Gp-1); Zr-Hf-U-Nb-Th-Al-P-Mo-Ga (Gp-2); K-Na-Ca-Mg-Ba-Rb-Sr (Gp-3); and La-Ce-Co-Mn-Y-Zn-Cd (Gp-4). Moreover, the distribution patterns of elements varied significantly among the three major geological domains. The whole data indicate a strong imprint of local geological setting in the geochemical associations and point to a dominant geogenic origin for the analyzed elements. Copper and Fe in Gp-1 were enriched in the Carajás basin and are associated with metavolcanic rocks and banded-iron formations, respectively. However, the spatial distribution of Cu is also highly influenced by two hydrothermal mineralized copper belts. Ni-Cr in Gp-1 are highly correlated and spatially associated with mafic and ultramafic units. The Gp-2 is partially composed of high field strength elements (Zr, Hf, Nb, U, Th) that could be linked to occurrences of A-type Neoarchean granites. The Gp-3 elements are mobile elements which are commonly found in feldspars and other rock-forming minerals being liberated by chemical weathering. The background threshold values (BTV) were estimated separately for surface and deep soils using different methods. The ’75th percentile’, which commonly used for the estimation of the quality reference values (QRVs) following the Brazilian regulation, gave more restrictive or conservative (low) BTVs, while the ‘MMAD‘ was more realistic to define high BTVs that can better represent the so-called mineralized/normal background. Compared with CONAMA Resolution (No. 420/2009), the conservative BTVs of most of the toxic elements were below the prevention limits (PV), except Cu, but when the high BTVs are considered, Cu, Co, Cr and Ni exceeded the PV limits. The degree of contamination (Cdeg), based on the conservative BTVs, indicates low contamination, except in the Carajás basin, which shows many anomalies and had high contamination mainly from Cu, Cr and Ni, but this is similar between surface and deep soils indicating that the observed high anomalies are strictly related to geogenic control. This is supported when the Cdeg is calculated using the high BTVs, which indicates low contamination. This suggests that the use of only conservative BTVs for the entire region might overestimate the significance of anthropogenic contamination; thus, we suggest the use of high BTVs for effective assessment of soil contamination in this region. The methodology and results of this study may help developing strategies for geochemical mapping in other Carajás soils or in other Amazonian soils with similar characteristics.

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Why Premed Students Should Take Statistics Before Medical School – Yahoo Finance

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Among the prerequisite courses for medical school, the subject of statistics doesn’t usually pop into one’s mind.” data-reactid=”11″>Among the prerequisite courses for medical school, the subject of statistics doesn’t usually pop into one’s mind.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Statistics is the study of data collection, analysis, interpretation and presentation. Another way to think about statistics is that it provides the framework to generate and share new knowledge about our world, including in biology and medicine. Having a solid grasp of statistics in college can help students succeed in medical school and beyond.” data-reactid=”12″>Statistics is the study of data collection, analysis, interpretation and presentation. Another way to think about statistics is that it provides the framework to generate and share new knowledge about our world, including in biology and medicine. Having a solid grasp of statistics in college can help students succeed in medical school and beyond.

Medicine is an incrementally growing, self-correcting field, and the most powerful stimulus for improving care often originates from large, well-designed clinical trials. By understanding statistics and how studies and trials are conducted and analyzed, students will be able to read through studies on their own and assess how a study’s purported findings should or should not affect how physicians provide care to patients.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="[Read: How to Plan College Courses to Prepare for Medical School.]” data-reactid=”14″>[Read: How to Plan College Courses to Prepare for Medical School.]

Not all clinical trials are created equal, and having a background in statistics will give students the ability to understand how data is collected and awareness of how data can be skewed or misrepresented.

By incorporating more knowledge of statistics in the medical field, physicians will be able to discern new studies and how to incorporate them into practice, helping us to think of the best practices in our increasingly data-driven profession. Understanding the strength of a piece of scientific evidence and when to apply it will be a key component of being a competent clinical student and future physician.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="And because medicine is becoming increasingly evidence-based, many medical schools offer structured opportunities to conduct medical research. Conducting research is especially important if a student is interested in pursuing competitive medical specialties such as dermatology, neurosurgery, plastic surgery and ophthalmology, or if they are interested in training at the top programs in any field.” data-reactid=”17″>And because medicine is becoming increasingly evidence-based, many medical schools offer structured opportunities to conduct medical research. Conducting research is especially important if a student is interested in pursuing competitive medical specialties such as dermatology, neurosurgery, plastic surgery and ophthalmology, or if they are interested in training at the top programs in any field.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="[Read: What Type of Research Helps You Get Into Medical School?]” data-reactid=”18″>[Read: What Type of Research Helps You Get Into Medical School?]

To apply successfully into these residency programs, productive research experiences and peer-reviewed publications are a must, rather than just nice-to-haves.

With a basic knowledge of statistics, students will be able to understand and determine the strength of existing research papers in their field of interest.

Furthermore, knowing how to collect, analyze, interpret and present data will help students get a head start on their research and become future clinician researchers who will be able to advance medical knowledge.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="[Read: 3 Types of Research Publications Premeds Can Work On.]” data-reactid=”22″>[Read: 3 Types of Research Publications Premeds Can Work On.]

Finally, besides playing a role in future discoveries and applications, statistics is a key part of everyday practice for any physician. One example lies in screening and diagnostic tests.

Medical tests, from pregnancy tests to HIV tests, are not foolproof; there are false negatives, false positives, true negatives and true positives. Assessing the usefulness of any medical test depends on having a general understanding of the pretest probability, specificities, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This sort of knowledge is not inherently intuitive, and for this reason, biostatistics is already a part of a medical student's preclinical education and is heavily tested in the United States Medical Licensing Examination — Steps 1, 2 and 3 — and in the clerkship-specific Shelf exams during the third and fourth year of medical school.” data-reactid=”25″>This sort of knowledge is not inherently intuitive, and for this reason, biostatistics is already a part of a medical student’s preclinical education and is heavily tested in the United States Medical Licensing Examination — Steps 1, 2 and 3 — and in the clerkship-specific Shelf exams during the third and fourth year of medical school.

Having a basic knowledge of statistics before attending medical school will prepare students to understand practical biostatistics used in everyday clinical practice.

More From US News & World Report

Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of tooth shape in hypodontia: II size variation.

Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of tooth shape in hypodontia: II size variation. nevin manimala, Anat Sci Int
Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of tooth shape in hypodontia: II size variation. nevin manimala, Anat Sci Int

The study aimed to evaluate differences in tooth size between patients with hypodontia and those with normal complement of permanent teeth using three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis. The number of anatomical landmarks was recorded on the clinical crown of the permanent teeth on three-dimensional scanned study models of hypodontia and in control subjects. The study sample comprised 120 patients with hypodontia (mild, moderate, severe) and 40 controls matched for age and sex. Tooth size differences were tested statistically using multivariate statistics. Size variation was for the most part found to be significant, especially when the control subjects were compared with the hypodontia groups. The explained variance among group membership was generally larger in the anterior and premolar region than in the molar region Sexual dimorphism was found less in the anterior region than in the posterior region; therefore, the sexes were pooled more often for teeth in the anterior region. Quantitative measurement of tooth size in patients with hypodontia may enhance the multidisciplinary management of these patients.

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Nevin Manimala SAS Certificate

Candace Owens Disgustingly Lies About Rape Statistics In Baltimore – BET

Candace Owens Disgustingly Lies About Rape Statistics In Baltimore - BET nevin manimala
Candace Owens Disgustingly Lies About Rape Statistics In Baltimore - BET nevin manimala

Conservative pundit Candace Owens claimed Black men in Baltimore is “leading” in rape crime statistics. She was wrong.

During an appearance on The Ingraham Angle alongside attorney Monique Pressley, Owens defended Donald Trump’s racist comments about the Maryland metropolis, spewing unfounded allegations about Baltimore.

“Do not defend Baltimore as a city, don’t do that to Black America. Don’t pretend that being in third place… somehow makes Trump a liar. They are leading a homicide! They are leading in rape! They are leading in sexual assault,” the 30-year-old made up. “Black Americans are suffering in the city. Because you don’t like trump you’re going to split hairs and pretend this is somehow okay because they are ranked third? We deserve better than that as a community. We deserve Trump!”

As journalist and SiriusXM host Clay Cane pointed out, this is a blatant lie and it is “media malpractice” to have Owens on television. Watch the clip below:

Statista.com reports no other city in Maryland ranks in the top 50.Instead, Anchorage, Alaska tops the list, with 125.1 rapes per 100,000 people, three times the national average. Anchorage is 63.65% white and only 5.48% Black. 

Pueblo, Colorado ranks second with 120.9 sexual assaults per 100,000 and Rapid City, South Dakota comes in third with 117.9 rapes per 100,000. Nationally, the rate is 27 per 100,000.

Forbes has Saginaw, Michigan as number one, Anchorage  at number two and Baltimore is not on their list. 

In 2014, CNN reported the state of Maryland was in the bottom ten of where rape is the most common. 

Owens’ words encourages the myth of the Black male rapist, which is an ongoing theme in history, often used as an excuse to lynch Black men.

In 2017, Biljana Oklopčić’s of the University of Osijek described how the stereotype of the Black male rapist originated in the southern states.

“Invented after emancipation, the Black rapist stereotype was the result of the increasing panic about racial intermixture after the abolition of slavery and reflected the American South’s obsession with protecting white womanhood to ensure the purity of the white race. The reproduction of this myth provided the basis for racial control, since it found justification in the belief that rape represented Black men’s wish to overthrow the Southern white supremacist society. The Black rapist stereotype centered on the assumption that the Black man, in the act of rape, was trying to reach [the] white Southern woman’s social and economic status of which she was the symbol.”

The myth of the Black rapist continues to perpetuate society, the criminal justice system and, clearly, on Fox News by pundits like Candace Owens.